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  1. #61
    Senior Member glen e's Avatar
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    forums are composed of three levels of individuals in my i opinion:
    1. those that are not die hard in any way, that just drive/buy/lease these cars and want to take care of them. We drive them as daily drivers
    2. those that are enthusiasts, that want to go the extra mile and really get OCD about their car, because it is their hobby
    3. those experts that are racers/hi perf guys and can quote spec and verse of the engine, and have been involved with building/testing and racing these cars for years.

    so naturally you get all sorts of answers here.

    The truth is this: you have to decide what you want to do to break in this car. I do agree that Chev is concerned about the warranty period but I also think they want the engine to take care of the customer long after it passes. So the manual CAN be followed with no problem. Not changing your oil until Chev and the manual tells is perfectly fine to do. If you want to do more, have at it.

    My only problem is when groups 2 and 3 scare the bejesus out of group 1, like they do with so many things on forums...totally unnecessary.
    Last edited by glen e; 03-29-2014 at 12:31 PM.
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  2. #62
    Senior Member U.S. Marine's Avatar
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    Jon, one boot at a time, and then drive that Vette like your breaking in a wild horse!!

    SF
    Rick
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  3. #63
    Senior Member rdslon01's Avatar
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    I don't know if those who fall into the racers/high performance guys are really an authority on the long-term behavior of an engine. They build and rebuild engines so regularly, I wonder what the maximum number of miles they get with an engine is before they rebuild it.

    Also, my present car (which is junk now) was bought new in 1999. It has the 3.5 L DOHC six cylinder GM engine which was put in the Oldsmobile Intrigue (that was all I could afford at the time - I was in school, and that was as far as I could reach, and it was a J.D. Powers bust buy for 1999). Frankly, I found that engine tremendously powerful (for me) with a nice, wide torque curve.

    Anyway, my point is that I broke it in with the "drive it like you stole it" school of thought. I think that was a big mistake. After about 115,000 miles it started using a LOT of oil. It is to the point now that I fill'er up with oil and check the gas. I have to keep a quart handy in the car...

    Never again will I break one in hard. From now on, I will go by the owner's manual. Why? Well, my experience is limited, but the one I did do I am not happy with. It is time to try something else (owner's manual this time).
    Last edited by rdslon01; 03-29-2014 at 10:39 AM.
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    Senior Member SwisStingray's Avatar
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    It's clear that everybody can do what he wants or feel better, there is no "one way" opinion !

    We only discuss about some fact that can be considered as very serious and that can can push on us to re-consider the way to break in an engine, also from factories like Ferrari, Maserati and Nissan with the GT-R for example. All are running quite hardly EACH car on a track before to ship them to the customers.

    We don't say here that we have to break in the engines so hardly ! The max. RPM have to be respected as in the owner's manual description but in a different way, to make simple (but not very precise):
    Change the oil quickly after the first Miles to eliminates metal particles which could only cause damages if you drive with them in the oil until 1200 Miles.
    Change the oil for a break in one then push hardly up to the indicated rpm (see owner's manual) and let decelerate many times, use the car until about to 1200 miles with the goal to have good RPM variations.
    After that change the filter and the oil for the final one.

    So now, please read that and compare, it's very instructive :roll eyes:

    My company sell car parts and engines along the years and I order the building of many short and long blocks along the years.
    Here is the exact way my motorist asks for a good break-in of the brand new Subaru engines he builds, be sure that his goal is to have no complaints about the blocks he sells !! :

    1/ Fill with special break in oil

    2/ Find a convenient and the most flat possible road to realize this stage:
    In 3rd or 4th, accelerate slowly from 2500 to 4500 rpm and decelerate in gear immediately to 2000 rpm
    Stay in 2000 rpm for 30 seconds to stabilize the internal temperature and begin again the process 10 times.

    3/ Then accelerate slowly 15 times from 2500 to 5500 rpm.
    Mean in slow motion and staying 1 minute between 2 processes there
    Then accelerate slowly 5 times from 2500 rpm up to the max. rpm
    Come back to idle and stay 1 minute between 2 processes there.

    4/ Drain the oil and change the filter. Refill with the synthetic oil.

    5/ The break in is 80% complete. The engines with forged parts have not to be used over 5500 rpm for the next 1800 miles.

    As you can see, there is a large difference with the way we are discussing here, it can be hard to go in this way with a brand new engine but, trust in me, it works and I never had a complaint regarding those engines reliability.
    greggshere likes this.
    SwisStingray aka Alain
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    Senior Member m3incorp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwisStingray View Post
    It's clear that everybody can do what he wants or feel better, there is no "one way" opinion !

    We only discuss about some fact that can be considered as very serious and that can can push on us to re-consider the way to break in an engine, also from factories like Ferrari, Maserati and Nissan with the GT-R for example. All are running quite hardly EACH car on a track before to ship them to the customers.

    We don't say here that we have to break in the engines so hardly ! The max. RPM have to be respected as in the owner's manual description but in a different way, to make simple (but not very precise):
    Change the oil quickly after the first Miles to eliminates metal particles which could only cause damages if you drive with them in the oil until 1200 Miles.
    Change the oil for a break in one then push hardly up to the indicated rpm (see owner's manual) and let decelerate many times, use the car until about to 1200 miles with the goal to have good RPM variations.
    After that change the filter and the oil for the final one.

    So now, please read that and compare, it's very instructive :roll eyes:

    My company sell car parts and engines along the years and I order the building of many short and long blocks along the years.
    Here is the exact way my motorist asks for a good break-in of the brand new Subaru engines he builds, be sure that his goal is to have no complaints about the blocks he sells !! :

    1/ Fill with special break in oil

    2/ Find a convenient and the most flat possible road to realize this stage:
    In 3rd or 4th, accelerate slowly from 2500 to 4500 rpm and decelerate in gear immediately to 2000 rpm
    Stay in 2000 rpm for 30 seconds to stabilize the internal temperature and begin again the process 10 times.

    3/ Then accelerate slowly 15 times from 2500 to 5500 rpm.
    Mean in slow motion and staying 1 minute between 2 processes there
    Then accelerate slowly 5 times from 2500 rpm up to the max. rpm
    Come back to idle and stay 1 minute between 2 processes there.

    4/ Drain the oil and change the filter. Refill with the synthetic oil.

    5/ The break in is 80% complete. The engines with forged parts have not to be used over 5500 rpm for the next 1800 miles.

    As you can see, there is a large difference with the way we are discussing here, it can be hard to go in this way with a brand new engine but, trust in me, it works and I never had a complaint regarding those engines reliability.
    I'm sure that procedure worked well BUT I just don't see a "normal" car owner following steps 1-5.

    I'm in the corner that one will break in "their" car, the way that they see fit. I have heard that certain manufacturers break in their cars before delivering to the customer. I will say this, your Corvette is not from one of those manufacturers, so what is good for one is not necessarily good for another.

    I say break it in the way you want and then DON'T forget preventative maintenance. (Not referring to that maintenance that your dealer may recommend as a cash flow, but the real preventive maintenance).

  7. #66
    Senior Member tmcternan's Avatar
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    Oh! I can't believe I'm about to say this.... But, after researching the subject further I'm beginning to get second thoughts on the break-in oil subject. Engine oil, just like individuals opinions vary substantially from one to the other. Seems GM is using 5W30 Mobil 1 Dexos, which sets the standard for all other synthetics on the market and if you go on line to Mobil One's website and click on "Frequently asked questions," it may shed some light on the subject. Now, Mobil 1 is the most expensive synthetic oil on the market, and my guess is there's a reason for that. Either way, I found a couple of sites that might convince you the oil that's coming in our C-7's is okay.

    The first one is "Road Carvin.com and the second is Mobil 1's site as follows:

    http://www.roadcarvin.com

    -AND-

    http://www.mobiloil.com

    Just check it out and come to your own conclusions.
    Last edited by elegant; 03-29-2014 at 05:59 PM.

  8. #67
    Senior Member U.S. Marine's Avatar
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    tmcternan, great read and good info

    SF
    Rick
    2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray C7 Masterpiece, Torch Red, Jet Black Interior. Delivered to our home on 2 March 2014 from MacMulkin Chevrolet, Nashua, NH.
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  9. #68
    Senior Member SwisStingray's Avatar
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    From Mobil website :
    "Mobil 1 (synthetic)reduce oil breakdown and minimize engine wear – keeping your engine running like new"
    Sorry but what a brand new engine need is all but a too slippery oil ! (pistons rings need to be seated and that can be correctly done only if there is a slight abrasion.
    In their FAQ :
    "Today's engines are built with much tighter tolerances, much improved machining, and under much cleaner conditions compared to the engines of 10 or 20 years ago. Current engine manufacturing technology does not require a break-in period using petroleum-based motor oils"
    That's "terrible"...The engine I order to build to my motorist are all assembled with 1/2 gram tolerance between each rods and each pistons and are so much more balanced, much more well machined and have much better tolerances possibles than big production engine but they require a break in mineral oil with a hard using (see upper).

    Regarding the roadcarvin link, all I read is simply the same for Mobil and completely different from RedLine and Amsoil (break in oil requiring).

    Don't misunderstand me, I dont want to impose my opinions. I just try to be the most impartial possible after reading and pointing to the contradictions in a lot of things and adding my professional experiences.

    The big cars companies cannot (or don't want) to recommend anything very different regarding the break in as 99% of the customers would not understand, would be able or would not take care of other instructions like the ones we are discussing about... but they could at least fill the new engines with break in oil as Honda did for the high performance engines, their engineers are not stupid guys.

    I have read here that the GM engines suffer generally of too big oil consumption and that make me a bit anxious for the future with my Stingray, so if something could help to avoid that I will do it as I cannot trust in an engine which eat too much oil.
    Last edited by SwisStingray; 03-30-2014 at 02:47 AM.
    SwisStingray aka Alain
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  10. #69
    Senior Member tmcternan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwisStingray View Post
    From Mobil website :
    "Mobil 1 (synthetic)reduce oil breakdown and minimize engine wear – keeping your engine running like new"
    Sorry but what a brand new engine need is all but a too slippery oil ! (pistons rings need to be seated and that can be correctly done only if there is a slight abrasion.
    In their FAQ :
    "Today's engines are built with much tighter tolerances, much improved machining, and under much cleaner conditions compared to the engines of 10 or 20 years ago. Current engine manufacturing technology does not require a break-in period using petroleum-based motor oils"
    That's "terrible"...The engine I order to build to my motorist are all assembled with 1/2 gram tolerance between each rods and each pistons and are so much more balanced, much more well machined and have much better tolerances possibles than big production engine but they require a break in mineral oil with a hard using (see upper).

    Regarding the roadcarvin link, all I read is simply the same for Mobil and completely different from RedLine and Amsoil (break in oil requiring).

    Don't misunderstand me, I dont want to impose my opinions. I just try to be the most impartial possible after reading and pointing to the contradictions in a lot of things and adding my professional experiences.

    The big cars companies cannot (or don't want) to recommend anything very different regarding the break in as 99% of the customers would not understand, would be able or would not take care of other instructions like the ones we are discussing about... but they could at least fill the new engines with break in oil as Honda did for the high performance engines, their engineers are not stupid guys.

    I have read here that the GM engines suffer generally of too big oil consumption and that make me a bit anxious for the future with my Stingray, so if something could help to avoid that I will do it as I cannot trust in an engine which eat too much oil.
    SwisStingray, no sweat buddy, don't mean to throw a wrench in the works for you. I too have been building race engines with much closer tolerances than OEM engines for almost 40-years now. And staying within a 1/2 gram on the balance is commendable. And my beliefs have been exactly the same as yours in regards to using a high quality mineral based oil for break-in, however after following this thread I decided to research the subject further. The reason I made that decision is because I always attempted to stay ahead of the curve and perform allot of R&D during the off race season. When I ran across the two articles I listed previously, I ended up concluding perhaps I was putting way too much thought into this. Mobil 1 Dexos is the most expensive synthetic motor oil on the market in the US. I think it runs around $9.00 a quart or $108.00 a case. All the different oils on the market have different additives, which makes them different from each other. Most people probably wouldn't even realize any differences except for race engine builders and those that might research the subject. When I went on Mobil's 1's sight, they provided a very compelling argument on behalf of they're particular product, and if I read it correctly in the roadcarvin article, they said Amsoil could also be used, however if you are going to use Red Line, Royal Purple and others, then a mineral based or Zink based oil would have to be used for break-in. In fact, I know Royal Purple has a mineral based oil available for break in purposes. Just remember my friend, not all oils and the additives put in them are the same....

  11. #70
    Banned Tuner Boost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdslon01 View Post
    I don't know if those who fall into the racers/high performance guys are really an authority on the long-term behavior of an engine. They build and rebuild engines so regularly, I wonder what the maximum number of miles they get with an engine is before they rebuild it.

    Also, my present car (which is junk now) was bought new in 1999. It has the 3.5 L DOHC six cylinder GM engine which was put in the Oldsmobile Intrigue (that was all I could afford at the time - I was in school, and that was as far as I could reach, and it was a J.D. Powers bust buy for 1999). Frankly, I found that engine tremendously powerful (for me) with a nice, wide torque curve.

    Anyway, my point is that I broke it in with the "drive it like you stole it" school of thought. I think that was a big mistake. After about 115,000 miles it started using a LOT of oil. It is to the point now that I fill'er up with oil and check the gas. I have to keep a quart handy in the car...

    Never again will I break one in hard. From now on, I will go by the owner's manual. Why? Well, my experience is limited, but the one I did do I am not happy with. It is time to try something else (owner's manual this time).
    What most likely happened with that engine was not your break-in procedure, it was the ringlands becoming eventually gummed up with residue from the oil mist in the PCV system. This causes the rings to stick and not be able to move freely and blowby and excess oil consumption is the result. If not you would have had oil usage growing gradually throughout the life of the engine. As engine builders of all types, we see this very often.

    Also, I think glen e posted a very accurate post as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by SwisStingray View Post
    It's clear that everybody can do what he wants or feel better, there is no "one way" opinion !

    We only discuss about some fact that can be considered as very serious and that can can push on us to re-consider the way to break in an engine, also from factories like Ferrari, Maserati and Nissan with the GT-R for example. All are running quite hardly EACH car on a track before to ship them to the customers.

    We don't say here that we have to break in the engines so hardly ! The max. RPM have to be respected as in the owner's manual description but in a different way, to make simple (but not very precise):
    Change the oil quickly after the first Miles to eliminates metal particles which could only cause damages if you drive with them in the oil until 1200 Miles.
    Change the oil for a break in one then push hardly up to the indicated rpm (see owner's manual) and let decelerate many times, use the car until about to 1200 miles with the goal to have good RPM variations.
    After that change the filter and the oil for the final one.

    So now, please read that and compare, it's very instructive :roll eyes:

    My company sell car parts and engines along the years and I order the building of many short and long blocks along the years.
    Here is the exact way my motorist asks for a good break-in of the brand new Subaru engines he builds, be sure that his goal is to have no complaints about the blocks he sells !! :

    1/ Fill with special break in oil

    2/ Find a convenient and the most flat possible road to realize this stage:
    In 3rd or 4th, accelerate slowly from 2500 to 4500 rpm and decelerate in gear immediately to 2000 rpm
    Stay in 2000 rpm for 30 seconds to stabilize the internal temperature and begin again the process 10 times.

    3/ Then accelerate slowly 15 times from 2500 to 5500 rpm.
    Mean in slow motion and staying 1 minute between 2 processes there
    Then accelerate slowly 5 times from 2500 rpm up to the max. rpm
    Come back to idle and stay 1 minute between 2 processes there.

    4/ Drain the oil and change the filter. Refill with the synthetic oil.

    5/ The break in is 80% complete. The engines with forged parts have not to be used over 5500 rpm for the next 1800 miles.

    As you can see, there is a large difference with the way we are discussing here, it can be hard to go in this way with a brand new engine but, trust in me, it works and I never had a complaint regarding those engines reliability.
    One of the best post's yet on this subject, and for the record, many do just fine with full syn and driving easy.....but that is a chance outcome. Yes, we as racers tear down 1/2 season and replace valve springs and lifters as preventive work and then do complete freshens at season end, but as product developers for the street performance crowd we also tear down all types of street engines as well and see far to often the crosshatch looking like it was just cut but is covered with the hard glaze and that is on engines consuming 1 qt every 1000 miles or so from new, so we can easily attribute the consumption to the rings never seating properly. Over time many other factors come into play, most related to the oil most ingested with the PCV vapors.

    Our personal vehicles (Google search on our old C5 bracket car):
    The 184,000 mile old C5 Bracket Beater - CorvetteOnline.com

    We try and run hundreds of thousands of miles trouble free, and this car when sold had over 200k miles, most 1/4 mile at a time, was broke in at the dragstrip and never consumed oil over it's life. We did go through a few trannies and alternators, batteries and brakes, but that's it. it paid for itself several times over. So it was a street car broken in at the dragstrip when new, and run hard and put away wet far to often.

    By the way, Son-in-law one in both Stock and Super Stock this weekend in Vegas, and the entire family is out there putting on the Spring Fling Vegas 20's (the highest driver attended drag race event in the history of drag racing) The 184,000 mile old C5 Bracket Beater - CorvetteOnline.com

    Quote Originally Posted by SwisStingray View Post
    From Mobil website :
    "Mobil 1 (synthetic)reduce oil breakdown and minimize engine wear – keeping your engine running like new"
    Sorry but what a brand new engine need is all but a too slippery oil ! (pistons rings need to be seated and that can be correctly done only if there is a slight abrasion.
    In their FAQ :
    "Today's engines are built with much tighter tolerances, much improved machining, and under much cleaner conditions compared to the engines of 10 or 20 years ago. Current engine manufacturing technology does not require a break-in period using petroleum-based motor oils"
    That's "terrible"...The engine I order to build to my motorist are all assembled with 1/2 gram tolerance between each rods and each pistons and are so much more balanced, much more well machined and have much better tolerances possibles than big production engine but they require a break in mineral oil with a hard using (see upper).

    Regarding the roadcarvin link, all I read is simply the same for Mobil and completely different from RedLine and Amsoil (break in oil requiring).

    Don't misunderstand me, I dont want to impose my opinions. I just try to be the most impartial possible after reading and pointing to the contradictions in a lot of things and adding my professional experiences.

    The big cars companies cannot (or don't want) to recommend anything very different regarding the break in as 99% of the customers would not understand, would be able or would not take care of other instructions like the ones we are discussing about... but they could at least fill the new engines with break in oil as Honda did for the high performance engines, their engineers are not stupid guys.

    I have read here that the GM engines suffer generally of too big oil consumption and that make me a bit anxious for the future with my Stingray, so if something could help to avoid that I will do it as I cannot trust in an engine which eat too much oil.
    I also agree. The first 400-500 miles are so critical to ring seat, and the better the oil is at protecting, the less chance of this occurring. But that does not mean your guaranteed to have a oil burner if you do follow owners manual, just a higher chance of that.

  12. #71
    Banned Tuner Boost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdslon01 View Post
    I don't know if those who fall into the racers/high performance guys are really an authority on the long-term behavior of an engine. They build and rebuild engines so regularly, I wonder what the maximum number of miles they get with an engine is before they rebuild it.

    Also, my present car (which is junk now) was bought new in 1999. It has the 3.5 L DOHC six cylinder GM engine which was put in the Oldsmobile Intrigue (that was all I could afford at the time - I was in school, and that was as far as I could reach, and it was a J.D. Powers bust buy for 1999). Frankly, I found that engine tremendously powerful (for me) with a nice, wide torque curve.

    Anyway, my point is that I broke it in with the "drive it like you stole it" school of thought. I think that was a big mistake. After about 115,000 miles it started using a LOT of oil. It is to the point now that I fill'er up with oil and check the gas. I have to keep a quart handy in the car...

    Never again will I break one in hard. From now on, I will go by the owner's manual. Why? Well, my experience is limited, but the one I did do I am not happy with. It is time to try something else (owner's manual this time).
    What most likely happened with that engine was not your break-in procedure, it was the ringlands becoming eventually gummed up with residue from the oil mist in the PCV system. This causes the rings to stick and not be able to move freely and blowby and excess oil consumption is the result. If not you would have had oil usage growing gradually throughout the life of the engine. As engine builders of all types, we see this very often.

    Also, I think glen e posted a very accurate post as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by SwisStingray View Post
    It's clear that everybody can do what he wants or feel better, there is no "one way" opinion !

    We only discuss about some fact that can be considered as very serious and that can can push on us to re-consider the way to break in an engine, also from factories like Ferrari, Maserati and Nissan with the GT-R for example. All are running quite hardly EACH car on a track before to ship them to the customers.

    We don't say here that we have to break in the engines so hardly ! The max. RPM have to be respected as in the owner's manual description but in a different way, to make simple (but not very precise):
    Change the oil quickly after the first Miles to eliminates metal particles which could only cause damages if you drive with them in the oil until 1200 Miles.
    Change the oil for a break in one then push hardly up to the indicated rpm (see owner's manual) and let decelerate many times, use the car until about to 1200 miles with the goal to have good RPM variations.
    After that change the filter and the oil for the final one.

    So now, please read that and compare, it's very instructive :roll eyes:

    My company sell car parts and engines along the years and I order the building of many short and long blocks along the years.
    Here is the exact way my motorist asks for a good break-in of the brand new Subaru engines he builds, be sure that his goal is to have no complaints about the blocks he sells !! :

    1/ Fill with special break in oil

    2/ Find a convenient and the most flat possible road to realize this stage:
    In 3rd or 4th, accelerate slowly from 2500 to 4500 rpm and decelerate in gear immediately to 2000 rpm
    Stay in 2000 rpm for 30 seconds to stabilize the internal temperature and begin again the process 10 times.

    3/ Then accelerate slowly 15 times from 2500 to 5500 rpm.
    Mean in slow motion and staying 1 minute between 2 processes there
    Then accelerate slowly 5 times from 2500 rpm up to the max. rpm
    Come back to idle and stay 1 minute between 2 processes there.

    4/ Drain the oil and change the filter. Refill with the synthetic oil.

    5/ The break in is 80% complete. The engines with forged parts have not to be used over 5500 rpm for the next 1800 miles.

    As you can see, there is a large difference with the way we are discussing here, it can be hard to go in this way with a brand new engine but, trust in me, it works and I never had a complaint regarding those engines reliability.
    One of the best post's yet on this subject, and for the record, many do just fine with full syn and driving easy.....but that is a chance outcome. Yes, we as racers tear down 1/2 season and replace valve springs and lifters as preventive work and then do complete freshens at season end, but as product developers for the street performance crowd we also tear down all types of street engines as well and see far to often the crosshatch looking like it was just cut but is covered with the hard glaze and that is on engines consuming 1 qt every 1000 miles or so from new, so we can easily attribute the consumption to the rings never seating properly. Over time many other factors come into play, most related to the oil most ingested with the PCV vapors.

    Our personal vehicles (Google search on our old C5 bracket car):
    The 184,000 mile old C5 Bracket Beater - CorvetteOnline.com

    We try and run hundreds of thousands of miles trouble free, and this car when sold had over 200k miles, most 1/4 mile at a time, was broke in at the dragstrip and never consumed oil over it's life. We did go through a few trannies and alternators, batteries and brakes, but that's it. it paid for itself several times over. So it was a street car broken in at the dragstrip when new, and run hard and put away wet far to often.

    By the way, Son-in-law one in both Stock and Super Stock this weekend in Vegas, and the entire family is out there putting on the Spring Fling Vegas 20's (the highest driver attended drag race event in the history of drag racing)

    Quote Originally Posted by SwisStingray View Post
    From Mobil website :
    "Mobil 1 (synthetic)reduce oil breakdown and minimize engine wear – keeping your engine running like new"
    Sorry but what a brand new engine need is all but a too slippery oil ! (pistons rings need to be seated and that can be correctly done only if there is a slight abrasion.
    In their FAQ :
    "Today's engines are built with much tighter tolerances, much improved machining, and under much cleaner conditions compared to the engines of 10 or 20 years ago. Current engine manufacturing technology does not require a break-in period using petroleum-based motor oils"
    That's "terrible"...The engine I order to build to my motorist are all assembled with 1/2 gram tolerance between each rods and each pistons and are so much more balanced, much more well machined and have much better tolerances possibles than big production engine but they require a break in mineral oil with a hard using (see upper).

    Regarding the roadcarvin link, all I read is simply the same for Mobil and completely different from RedLine and Amsoil (break in oil requiring).

    Don't misunderstand me, I dont want to impose my opinions. I just try to be the most impartial possible after reading and pointing to the contradictions in a lot of things and adding my professional experiences.

    The big cars companies cannot (or don't want) to recommend anything very different regarding the break in as 99% of the customers would not understand, would be able or would not take care of other instructions like the ones we are discussing about... but they could at least fill the new engines with break in oil as Honda did for the high performance engines, their engineers are not stupid guys.

    I have read here that the GM engines suffer generally of too big oil consumption and that make me a bit anxious for the future with my Stingray, so if something could help to avoid that I will do it as I cannot trust in an engine which eat too much oil.
    I also agree. The first 400-500 miles are so critical to ring seat, and the better the oil is at protecting, the less chance of this occurring. But that does not mean your guaranteed to have a oil burner if you do follow owners manual, just a higher chance of that.
    SwisStingray likes this.

  13. #72
    Senior Member Area 473's Avatar
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    Over the years this topic is probably falls somewhere in the top ten and just below politics. It's fluid (pun) and changes with new oils, engine materials and manufacturing technology. There's the racing group, the weekend warriors and the daily driver groups, all with different views and experiences. Another consideration is geographical location, ie. temperatures. In Alaska we have extremes on the lower end and frankly, the daily commute doesn't always allow the engine to reach it's operating temperature. Then there is the fuels, those have changed with environmental laws and are a factor in the both cooling as well as lubrication. I have a background in flying, piston engines, and with that, you are tasked with managing temperature's where as in a car it's pretty much taken care of. Air cooled engines see temperature fluctuations that can vary widely and gas and oil play a huge role in managing those. Break in on a new piston engine in an airplane is mineral oil, after that it's either that, synthetic, or a back and forth switch between summer and winter.

    There's a lot more that goes into all this than meets the eye and or any one persons experience. The point I'm making is there is no one size fit's all and with the tightly controlled temperatures, fuel mixes and tolerances today I think the manufactures recommended break in procedures are probably the best route. Special circumstances, location, operating environment and even fuel blends across different locals can and could and sometimes should be taken into consideration though.

    Kurt
    smokey12 likes this.
    2014 Premier Edition, 473 of 500. Z51, 3LT

  14. #73
    Senior Member SwisStingray's Avatar
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    What a tasty subject ! I love that.

    Being here is basically because we are cars passionates...OK Vette's passionates ;-) and the money investment to get it is not peanuts. So it's a very good reason (at least for me) to invest some time to think about the better way to start the life with our new mistress to obtain the best of the pleasures we can expect of this sexy C7
    SwisStingray aka Alain
    English is not my native language, so please be tolerant Hidden Content -- '15 Z51, Shark Gray, M7, MRC, 3LT Kalahari with Competition seats, carbon fiber instrument panel... Still added: Apsis carbon fiber console and diverses, GM front lip, Z06 grille, special painted wheels, MGW shifter, catch can, ACS side skirts, G3 fins.

  15. #74
    Senior Member SwisStingray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glen e View Post
    forums are composed of three levels of individuals in my i opinion:
    1. those that are not die hard in any way, that just drive/buy/lease these cars and want to take care of them. We drive them as daily drivers
    2. those that are enthusiasts, that want to go the extra mile and really get OCD about their car, because it is their hobby
    3. those experts that are racers/hi perf guys and can quote spec and verse of the engine, and have been involved with building/testing and racing these cars for years.

    so naturally you get all sorts of answers here.

    The truth is this: you have to decide what you want to do to break in this car. I do agree that Chev is concerned about the warranty period but I also think they want the engine to take care of the customer long after it passes. So the manual CAN be followed with no problem. Not changing your oil until Chev and the manual tells is perfectly fine to do. If you want to do more, have at it.

    My only problem is when groups 2 and 3 scare the bejesus out of group 1, like they do with so many things on forums...totally unnecessary.
    I feel that the focus is (partly?) on me, I apologize if you feel that I'm too much invested in this subject.
    I'm a newbie over here but an old member of other cars forums in Europe and where the way we discuss like in this subject don't hurt anybody. Now I'm here and I have found a subject regarding another way to consider an important technical question an it have been an opportunity for me to participate to an interesting discussion, without any goal than to be debatable... that could perhaps be a mistake for you.

    I don't try to impose anything to anybody and that have to be clear one more time.
    Last edited by SwisStingray; 03-31-2014 at 03:58 PM.
    SwisStingray aka Alain
    English is not my native language, so please be tolerant Hidden Content -- '15 Z51, Shark Gray, M7, MRC, 3LT Kalahari with Competition seats, carbon fiber instrument panel... Still added: Apsis carbon fiber console and diverses, GM front lip, Z06 grille, special painted wheels, MGW shifter, catch can, ACS side skirts, G3 fins.

  16. #75
    Senior Member booie's Avatar
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    Does anyone know how many miles were on them and if the C7's were all brokin in when they GM gave there cars to the magazine companies and let them do multiple test ( quarter mile, skid pad, breaking , track times, etc. etc.) ? All those cars ran flawlessly if I'm correct. My money is with Tuner Boost. Just my 2 cents.

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