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According to GM Authority press release, written by BY SAM MCEACHERN— DEC 11, 2019, the 2020 Corvette Is Now Completely Sold Out. Here is the article:

All examples of the 2020 Corvette that will roll off the line at Bowling Green Assembly next year have been spoken for, General Motors has confirmed.

Speaking to Motor Trend at the recent launch of the 2021 Chevrolet Tahoe and 2021 Chevrolet Suburban, GM North America president Barry Engle said GM plans to build 40,000 examples of the 2020 Corvette next year, all of which have already been sold. This includes both the standard Corvette and the new Corvette Convertible.

Engle also said that dealerships are being encouraged to sell the 2020 Corvette at its manufacturer suggested retail price, but added that Chevrolet dealerships are private businesses and can sell them for a price they see fit. The mid-engine sports car starts at $59,995 for the entry-level 1LT model.

It’s not very surprising to hear that GM has sold out all of 2020 Corvette build slots. Back in August, the automaker’s Vice President of Global Design, Michael Simcoe, said the car was close to being completely spoken for and “that it’s bound to be sold out soon.” The car has since won a number of automotive industry accolades, including 2020 Motor Trend Car of the Year and Car and Driver 10 Best, which may have driven up the demand even further.

A previous report from Motor Trend claimed that GM loses money on all C8 Corvettes that are sold for less than $80,000. The automaker had allegedly developed the car with a $79,995 base price in mind, but didn’t want to lose traditional Corvette buyers in switching to the mid-engine model and priced it from $59,995. Luckily for GM, the price of the 2020 Corvette can rise quite quickly once the customer begins to tack on options like the $5,000 Z51 performance package and $1,150 high wing rear spoiler, for example.

The 2020 Corvette is expected to start rolling off the assembly line in Bowling Green in early February. The plant is currently idle, with GM re-tooling it to produce the next-generation Corvette and also re-training assembly line employees. The car was originally scheduled to start rolling off the line at Bowling Green in December, but the 40-day UAW strike delayed its arrival by a couple of months.
 

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According to GM Authority press release, written by BY SAM MCEACHERN— DEC 11, 2019, the 2020 Corvette Is Now Completely Sold Out. Here is the article:

All examples of the 2020 Corvette that will roll off the line at Bowling Green Assembly next year have been spoken for, General Motors has confirmed.

Speaking to Motor Trend at the recent launch of the 2021 Chevrolet Tahoe and 2021 Chevrolet Suburban, GM North America president Barry Engle said GM plans to build 40,000 examples of the 2020 Corvette next year, all of which have already been sold. This includes both the standard Corvette and the new Corvette Convertible.

Engle also said that dealerships are being encouraged to sell the 2020 Corvette at its manufacturer suggested retail price, but added that Chevrolet dealerships are private businesses and can sell them for a price they see fit. The mid-engine sports car starts at $59,995 for the entry-level 1LT model.

It’s not very surprising to hear that GM has sold out all of 2020 Corvette build slots. Back in August, the automaker’s Vice President of Global Design, Michael Simcoe, said the car was close to being completely spoken for and “that it’s bound to be sold out soon.” The car has since won a number of automotive industry accolades, including 2020 Motor Trend Car of the Year and Car and Driver 10 Best, which may have driven up the demand even further.

A previous report from Motor Trend claimed that GM loses money on all C8 Corvettes that are sold for less than $80,000. The automaker had allegedly developed the car with a $79,995 base price in mind, but didn’t want to lose traditional Corvette buyers in switching to the mid-engine model and priced it from $59,995. Luckily for GM, the price of the 2020 Corvette can rise quite quickly once the customer begins to tack on options like the $5,000 Z51 performance package and $1,150 high wing rear spoiler, for example.

The 2020 Corvette is expected to start rolling off the assembly line in Bowling Green in early February. The plant is currently idle, with GM re-tooling it to produce the next-generation Corvette and also re-training assembly line employees. The car was originally scheduled to start rolling off the line at Bowling Green in December, but the 40-day UAW strike delayed its arrival by a couple of months.
I am told I will now get my new 3LT Z51 around June 2020, but I will believe it when I et a confirmation it is at the dealership. I was at the California reveal where I order my car by code -and it is an amazing vehicle- that makes my highly customized 2018 C-7 Z06 look old and outdated.
 

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The story that the C8 is sold out has been thoroughly debunked. GM has issued a "clarification." The big dealers have said they still have allocations, and I know one small dealer near me still had one as of last weekend.

 

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The story that the C8 is sold out has been thoroughly debunked. GM has issued a "clarification." The big dealers have said they still have allocations, and I know one small dealer near me still had one as of last weekend.

Whether or not they are all already spoken for, does anyone have information on exactly how many Corvettes GM plans to produce in 2020? --Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Whether or not they are all already spoken for, does anyone have information on exactly how many Corvettes GM plans to produce in 2020? --Bob
No Bob, that is undecided or at least not revealed publicly at this time.
 

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No Bob, that is undecided or at least not revealed publicly at this time.
It makes you wonder how they can say all allocations are sold out if they don't now how many they will produce. I am sure they have clear production targets for the plant management but actual production may vary and it would not surprise me if more allocations become available. Still, doesn't really matter to me as I am happy with my C7. --Bob
 

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Sold out or not, that's fine... Personally I would not buy the first production year of any car which has undergone such significant changes. I did not buy the 2014 C7, I bought the 2015 and I haven't had a single recall on my Corvette (Z51, convertible, 7 manual). I may consider buying the 2021 C8. Also, I have a hard time deciding on a color from a computer screen, I do better seeing it in person. And last, the C7 started off with a bang and then sales "normalized" a little more after a year or two as far as pricing and availability was concerned. I'm sure the C8 will experience a similar trend. Soooo... no problem for me that the C8 is (perhaps) sold out.... there'll be opportunities in the future to buy one.
 

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For those of you who are old enough, remember what happened in 1983 when they announced the C4? Just as much fanfare and publicity as the C8. A dramatic departure from the C3. A car that could go head-to-head with the European supercars. We might laugh at that now, but at the time it was that big a difference. Chevy didn't get it right until 1986 when they switched from crossfire ignition and offered a convertible. I bought a 1982 for a steep discount, planning on trading it in after a few years. I ended up selling it to get a car with a back seat because my wife didn't want me putting the baby in the front seat of my vette, but I digress. I used the same logic to justify buying a C7 a few weeks ago. I think we'll probably be saying the same thing about "getting it right" in a couple of years. Hopefully, I'll be trading my C7 in for a C8 Grand Sport soon. If we have another kid, it would be a miracle!

I've read threads elsewhere from folks who think that those of us who are taking advantage of the current offers are being stupid. I'm not sure those folks have thought this out.

As for sold-out I bet you can buy one from most any one of the dealers. Folks occasionally change their mind and cancel their order. My bet is that GM won't be able to fill all the orders before the model year switch due to production issues. I would expect them to honor the contract however with delivery of a 2021.
 

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No Bob, that is undecided or at least not revealed publicly at this time.
Tadge said in a recent interview that they will be producing about 40,000 Stingrays. It will be their highest production year since the 1980's. Remember, they're putting on a second shift, so that will ramp up production output.
 

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Tadge said in a recent interview that they will be producing about 40,000 Stingrays. It will be their highest production year since the 1980's. Remember, they're putting on a second shift, so that will ramp up production output.
They will need a 3rd shift for all the recalls. The first year of a major change will be major missteps and there will be a need for modifications. The start being 2 months in the hole could be rectified by making the 2020 a 2021 and making 80,000 cars the target for the extended launch year that is already problematic.
 

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They will need a 3rd shift for all the recalls. The first year of a major change will be major missteps and there will be a need for modifications. The start being 2 months in the hole could be rectified by making the 2020 a 2021 and making 80,000 cars the target for the extended launch year that is already problematic.
Kevin, I think and hope, that your prediction is off the mark. The C7 was also a major change from the C6 (engine, transmissions, body, etc.) and there were not major recalls that hampered production rates. Yes, there were a number of both minor and in some cases larger software modifications, and some hardware modifications necessary during the first year. But there are also many of us who purchased very early C7s that have, to date, experienced only minor issues.
 

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Kevin, I think and hope, that your prediction is off the mark. The C7 was also a major change from the C6 (engine, transmissions, body, etc.) and there were not major recalls that hampered production rates. Yes, there were a number of both minor and in some cases larger software modifications, and some hardware modifications necessary during the first year. But there are also many of us who purchased very early C7s that have, to date, experienced only minor issues.
I would hope so too. I want nothing but the best for this car but experience tells me to wait until the 3rd year of production. With the disappointing Nurburgring run, it looks like my C7 is still a force to be reckoned with. Besides that, I would be awfully pissed to get a 2020 and have it turn a year old only 6 months in the game. That's major depreciation.
 

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They will need a 3rd shift for all the recalls. The first year of a major change will be major missteps and there will be a need for modifications. The start being 2 months in the hole could be rectified by making the 2020 a 2021 and making 80,000 cars the target for the extended launch year that is already problematic.
As they did with the introduction of the C7, GM will place an 8-10 week quality control hold on the C8 so that any production issues can be rectified before any cars are delivered to dealers. If you recall from late 2013, the plant parking lots were jam-packed for weeks with thousands of 2014 Stingrays wrapped and ready to ship, but on QC hold. In the case of this revolutionary design change, GM knows they can’t afford any missteps and will be ultra cautious.

With regard to the first production year, the notion of widespread problems is largely a myth. As with any production run, these cars have been, and continue to be, rigorously tested. Will a few customers find new and innovative ways to break theirs? Yes. Will it be doom and gloom for all or even many? No.

I bought an early production 2014 Stingray and it was a gem. I sold it to buy my first-year Grand Sport and the current owner of the Stingray tells me it’s running like a top. Same with my Grand Sport. Your beliefs are your beliefs, but while I’m driving my 2020 Stingray, you’ll be waiting through at least two price increases to get yours. ...just sayin’...

I’ll wave when I see ya on the road, Kevin.
 

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Is this still being discussed? lol... If you can do simple math, they can probably make about 36,000 cars for what's left of the model year. (Figure about 16-20% of production less than if there were no strike) Yes, probably all the allocation spots are taken. But, and a big but, nobody knows how many people reserved spots at multiple dealers and will only take one car. Canceling their spot on other lists when they get the first call... By my math, I probably won't be getting a 2020 car... I'm number 520ish at Criswell, (out of some 680 allocations...) It might be really close. But Mike Furman, said that historically, 30-40% of people with reservations, drop out... We will see.
 

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Good luck to those that are first in with the C8. After reading Hagerty story this morning about hidden dealer mark ups and that Chevy can't do anything about it, I am personally in no hurry to be first on the block with one.... Hahahaha, in fact, I'm still the only one on the block with the C7 and it's a very long block :). I made such a good deal on my 15 back in 16, the only way I'll do the C8 will be if I get a similar deal and I'm sure that won't be happening anytime soon. So, I'll just continue to enjoy my Z51 C7 with all the bells and whistles and wave to any C8's when they eventually start hitting the road.
 
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