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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There's no way I was going to get a new Z51 without the manual but I would really like my wife to be able to drive it also. I am still waiting for my C7 to be built so I am just wondering if anyone here has taught a newbie to drive manual on their new C7 and what their experience was.
 

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I learned on a C5, well almost... Looking back, it was funny having my Dad go with me to the dealer to pick it up so he could drive it home for me.

And there is sat in my driveway all weekend... I was just looking at it knowing I couldn't drive it. The next day my buddy came by with his Camaro SS and he let me practice on it for a couple hours. The day after that another buddy let me practice on his 99 Celica. And then a few hours later I was able to drive my C5 no problems.

I took the car out around midnight when there were no cars on the round and practiced driving to my office and to some of my favorite restaurants. I felt confident driving it to work the next day.


10 years later I taught my girlfriend at the time, how to drive manual in that same car. I took to her to a parking lot to practice.
 

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driving a stick

I would have her learn on a rental or good friend's car that is a manual. The C7 clutch is very light and engages a little higher off the floor than some manuals. The torque of the engine and hill holder feature (you can't turn it off) takes some getting used too.

I like it (hill holder) in seattle but it is an adjustment. The HUD helps you when shifting 5-6-7 and back down due to their relative position from the centering point of the shifter.

Try weather mode as it may give slightly less power overall.

Good luck. The blind spots are also feature to be dealt with (might be a bit much if she is learning to drive a stick)
My 0.02c
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would have her learn on a rental or good friend's car that is a manual. The C7 clutch is very light and engages a little higher off the floor than some manuals. The torque of the engine and hill holder feature (you can't turn it off) takes some getting used too.

I like it (hill holder) in seattle but it is an adjustment. The HUD helps you when shifting 5-6-7 and back down due to their relative position from the centering point of the shifter.

Try weather mode as it may give slightly less power overall.

Good luck. The blind spots are also feature to be dealt with (might be a bit much if she is learning to drive a stick)
My 0.02c
Funny you should say try a rental. I have looked everywhere and it seems no rental companies have stick shifts anymore. We flew to Florida a couple weeks ago for vacation and I asked the rental guy at the airport for a manual but he said no one has manuals anymore. Guess I will try and borrow a friends car for a week. I thought of buying some old car for less than 3000 with a stick just for her to learn on but that would probably be to much of a pain.

I thought since the C7 had so much power it would make it almost impossible to stall out for a newbie letting out the clutch slow even with no gas.

As for the "hill holder" feature, I was unaware the C7 had one. I guess that makes up for the lack of a traditional parking brake?
 

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Any thought of putting her in a drivers-ed class that teaches stick? Cheaper then a used car and better on your relationship.
 

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I learned to drive stick on my brand new 05 GTO. It was a moment I will never forget and I didn't hurt the clutch learning.
I was taught by my older brother when I was about 11. He parked an old piece of junk Chevette uphill on a slope in the Appalachian Mountains and coached me through it. It probably took me 10 minutes before I got it going without killing the engine. After that learning "curve" it was all "downhill" (pun intended) and easy from there. :) By the way, we always use the normal foot brake when starting on hills. Using the emergency brake is for non-mountain folk. :D

EDIT: After thinking back about it, I revised the time estimate. It probably took me longer than it now seems.
 
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This is the truth. I taught my 17 year old son and my wife to drive stick shift on my C7. My wife already knew the basics, but never actually drove a manual except just to try out a car or so. I was very nervous, but my son took about 3 lessons on 3 separate days. By the third day, he was better than my wife. Lesson one: On first gear, without giving it any gas, have your wife begin releasing the clutch ever so slightly until she get the car to move. The C7 is powerful enough for it to go without any gas. Do this a dozen time or more before telling her to give gas.
However, expect some MAJOR arguments and fights! :)) We had our share while teaching my wife.
 

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Growing up I had numerous toys such as quads and motorcycles. This was my first experience with manual transmissions. As I got older I started to drive some semi-tractors that I own for my business. I have always wanted to own a corvette and wouldn't think of getting it without a manual transmission (and only the traditional stick...no paddle shifters). When I saw the new C7 I knew I had to have it but I still had not come across anyone that owned a car that I could practice on. I definitely was not gonna let that stop me. Called all the local rental car companies with no luck at all. Turns out a cousin of mine was test driving the stingray (he works for gm) and he told me that I could go for a drive with him since I was getting ready to order one. So believe it or not my first experience driving a stick in an actual car was a Laguna blue stingray. Stalled it twice and had really no other problems for the rest of my 15 minute ride. I took delivery of my arctic white stingray in October and am LOVING it!!! I wouldn't say I drive with absolute confidence yet but that's also why I signed up for the May class at spring mountain. I'm sure after those 2 days my skills will be much better.
 

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Teach her on the new car! If anything breaks hopefully it is covered on warranty. She will do fine just be patient with her and teach her as much as you can before getting her in the driver seat.
 

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Everyone learns differently. In Europe there are many manual rental cars to learn on. That would be a good excuse for a vacation trip.
 

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My best driving a brand new car with a manual transmission story... in 1967 (oops, that may date me!) I went with a good friend to pick up his new Firebird 400 (a blue one, I had picked up one that was similar, but red). His dad dropped us off at the dealership (in Lansdowne Pennsylvania). After the paperwork, he got behind the wheel, and I jumped in shotgun... he looked at me and said "Al, will you drive it home for me?"... I couldn't believe it, I got to drive his new muscle car before he did... will never forget that evening!!!

Me with the '67... had only had the car about a week when this photo was taken.
67 Firebird 01.jpg
 

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What is the "hill holder" feature on a stick shift? Never heard of it before-- guess the concept is obvious, but can someone tell me how to access it, or how it works?
May have to teach the gf how to drive it.
 

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What is a "hill holder" feature on a stick shift? Never heard of it before. I guess the concept is obvious, but can someone tell me how to access it, or how it works?
When you are on a hill and release the clutch, the car will hold without rolling back for a couple of seconds to allow you to transition to the accelerator.
 

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Thanks TNSquire for the quick response-- and here I thought I knew everything about my car. You show how fortunate we are to have this forum.
 

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A Corvette is the easiest car to learn to drive a stick! The engine has so much torque, all you have to do is slowly let out the clutch without feeding any throttle at all.

The car will be rolling with the clutch out and ease on the throttle. I've taught my son and daughter on my C5 this way.

Then it's a matter of knowing when to shift and remembering to push the clutch in at a stop.
 

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I learned how to drive a stick on a Saab. After 75000 miles my transmission was gone. She could learn on a rental and be proficient enough after a few days. However if you let her drive it, be prepared to get a new transmission after about 90000 miles
 

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I have slowly been teaching my 22 year old daughter, who has never driven, how to shift and use the clutch in my 2014 7-speed. We have done it in parking lots. Of course she has stalled it a few times, but then again so have I. I think the transmission can handle it.
 

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There's no way I was going to get a new Z51 without the manual but I would really like my wife to be able to drive it also. I am still waiting for my C7 to be built so I am just wondering if anyone here has taught a newbie to drive manual on their new C7 and what their experience was.
I learned to drive stick in an old VW-based off-road sand rail, with a very patient older brother.

I don't think he would have EVER entertained the idea of teaching me in his Vette, although I certainly might have enjoyed it more. :cool:

I'd say it all depends on your circumstances, economic and otherwise. Personally, I wouldn't do it (grind those gears!).
 

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Funny you should say try a rental. I have looked everywhere and it seems no rental companies have stick shifts anymore. We flew to Florida a couple weeks ago for vacation and I asked the rental guy at the airport for a manual but he said no one has manuals anymore. Guess I will try and borrow a friends car for a week. I thought of buying some old car for less than 3000 with a stick just for her to learn on but that would probably be to much of a pain.

I thought since the C7 had so much power it would make it almost impossible to stall out for a newbie letting out the clutch slow even with no gas.

As for the "hill holder" feature, I was unaware the C7 had one. I guess that makes up for the lack of a traditional parking brake?
funny you should mention. i was going to take my son out to the raceway to drive the C7 on a track, but first he had to drive a stick, since they teach you there--but on sticks. i called every rental company around--big name and local--and found no one that rented sticks. I wouldnt ask a friend, due to the possible damage that can be done to the clutch. finally, i went to a driver teaching school, and they had a course for learning to drive sticks. try that route, depending on wherever you live. personally, i learned to drive a stick on my fathers 1949 (i think) chevy truck--many moons ago.

re: the hill holder, its kind of a crutch. real drivers dont need it. just go to the top of a steep hill, and practice, practice, practice. one of the most memorable 45 minutes of my life. after that, not a problem.
 
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