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For those of you with your manual transmission C7's, what style of braking/slowing down do you use most? For example, when going from 60 mph to a complete stop, are you down shifting through the gears to help slow the car down or do you just apply the brakes until you stop remaining in the same gear you were in at 60 mph? Is the wear on the clutch more than that on the brakes or vice versa? Just curious what people's preference is.
 

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Why limit it to the manual trany? I downshift RedHot frequently using the paddles where there is adequate space for me to slow down versus hitting the brakes. It also depends on my mood as to which method I use. I did the same thing with my manual in my Porsche. Done correctly (rev matching or double clutching with the manual) it should not impact the clutch.:cool:
 
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Why limit it to the manual trany? I downshift RedHot frequently using the paddles where there is adequate space for me to slow down versus hitting the brakes. It also depends on my mood as to which method I use. I did the same thing with my manual in my Porsche. Done correctly (rev matching or double clutching with the manual) it should not impact the clutch.:cool:
depends if you're performance driving, or typical town driving. performance driving you are not slipping the clutch as say you would when slowing at a traffic light.
 

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I live in a hilly area ....I always clutch to slow down always will its easier on the brakes. But I have still gone threw brakes and never a clutch in 8 yrs of the same vehicle.
I would think replacing rotors and pads on a c7 would cost more then a clutch as well.
:cool:
 

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Oh boy, your question could start a huge debate!

Since you're asking about a 60-0 mph, I'll re-phrase that to be "What is the fastest way to slow down 60-0 mph? Brakes only? Or brakes & downshift?" (Presumably we all know downshift only is not the right answer!)

The brakes are perfectly capable of locking up the wheels, and if setup correctly, all 4 wheels will lock at something approximately simultaneously. In other words, the brakes are powerful enough to do the job without "additional braking" from the engine via a downshift. So, for a minimum distance 60-0 mph stop, my vote is brakes only.
 

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For those of you with your manual transmission C7's, what style of braking/slowing down do you use most? For example, when going from 60 mph to a complete stop, are you down shifting through the gears to help slow the car down or do you just apply the brakes until you stop remaining in the same gear you were in at 60 mph? Is the wear on the clutch more than that on the brakes or vice versa? Just curious what people's preference is.
It all depends on how fast I want to slow down...fast = brakes only....
See the light change a few hundred yards down the road, then downshift and brake at end...
In between? Love the sound the pipes make when downshift for moderate quick stops....:D
 

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Agreed, brakes only are fastest, but for everyday driving, brakes and clutch keep you in control and ready to respond to changes in conditions. You should always be in a gear, never break in neutral. Brakes only are for emergency stopping or automatics. I have had 2 cars with 200,000 miles before they need a clutch, and I live in the mountains. Control should ALWAYS be a priority. I also have a commercial license and drive trucks, so you know where I am coming from.


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For fastest stopping, get hard on the breaks AND downshift also. Sure, if you have an either/or situation, you use breaks instead of downshifting. But this is not an either/or situation. You can use both. But if you use breaks only, you are giving up some of the load you could put on your wheels if you were to continually downshift while breaking, thereby forcing the wheels to give up some of their momentum which would go into turning the engine up to higher RPMs.

You also have to consider that breaks will mostly slow you from the front, but a rear wheel drive under engine breaking will help slow the other end of a car. Used together is best.

Anyway, breaks alone are not the fastest. Like PoconoG, I grew up in some mountains (Appalachian in Southeastern Kentucky).
 

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Agreed, brakes only are fastest, but for everyday driving, brakes and clutch keep you in control and ready to respond to changes in conditions. You should always be in a gear, never break in neutral. Brakes only are for emergency stopping or automatics. I have had 2 cars with 200,000 miles before they need a clutch, and I live in the mountains. Control should ALWAYS be a priority. I also have a commercial license and drive trucks, so you know where I am coming from.


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I also am a professional truck driver. 4 wheelers need to be looking farther down the road so they don't have to panic stop so much. I'd have to say, in a panic stop, hit the breaks and steer to avoid the obstacle. Save the down shifting for when you want to have fun, or have the room ahead.
 
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I also am a professional truck driver. 4 wheelers need to be looking farther down the road so they don't have to panic stop so much. I'd have to say, in a panic stop, hit the breaks and steer to avoid the obstacle. Save the down shifting for when you want to have fun, or have the room ahead.
ABSOLUTELY AGREE!

Playing with the left pedal and the stick adds absolutely nothing to maximizing braking.
 

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Before arriving at such conclusions, you should take a ride with someone who has a lot of experience using the clutch to get the engine to help the breaking. You will then find that you will feel the additional deceleration (your body getting slammed into the seat belts even harder) at those moments when the downshifts occur.

I guess I will close by saying that if you are not comfortable with this or do not feel like you can simultaneously steer, break and downshift at the same time, then skip the downshifting and do the other two. But if you are extremely comfortable doing this (as comfortable as walking), then this will help you break faster and stay more under control all at the same time.

Best wishes,
 

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Before arriving at such conclusions, you should take a ride with someone who has a lot of experience using the clutch to get the engine to help the breaking. You will then find that you will feel the additional deceleration (your body getting slammed into the seat belts even harder) at those moments when the downshifts occur.

I guess I will close by saying that if you are not comfortable with this or do not feel like you can simultaneously steer, break and downshift at the same time, then skip the downshifting and do the other two. But if you are extremely comfortable doing this (as comfortable as walking), then this will help you break faster and stay more under control all at the same time.

Best wishes,
Rodney, let's just respectfully agree to disagree. You believe that downshifting increases deceleration. I believe the brakes are perfectly capable of achieving maximum deceleration , and in a more controlled manner. (My comments are only about maximizing braking...60 to a complete stop, as per the OP's original question.)

I'll pass on taking a ride with "someone who has a lot of experience using the clutch to get the engine to help the breaking".
 

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It really depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If it's getting around the track as quickly as possible then no, do all your braking with the brakes and make sure you are downshifting to be in the proper gear to accelerate out of the next turn. If it's running a 6/10ths through the hills then sure, use engine braking on downshifts to scrub some speed instead of braking, it makes for a smoother transition. For normal around town driving downshift when you feel like it or push in the clutch and simply brake to a stop as you select the proper gear.

There is no one correct answer here.

However, one thing I can say with certainty is in a panic situation use what DE Instructors call "Both Feet" meaning full pressure on both pedals, clutch and brake. It's absolutely the fastest way to stop in a panic situation. Remember, if the clutch is engaged the brakes have to stop both the forward momentum of the car as well as the entire drive train. Disengage the drive train and let the brakes do their job.
 
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I say let those people use the clutch to brake instead of using the brakes, it keeps the mechanics that work on them in a higher paying job than just a pad slapper!
 

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It really depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If it's getting around the track as quickly as possible then no, do all your braking with the brakes and make sure you are downshifting to be in the proper gear to accelerate out of the next turn. If it's running a 6/10ths through the hills then sure, use engine braking on downshifts to scrub some speed instead of braking, it makes for a smoother transition. For normal around town driving downshift when you feel like it or push in the clutch and simply brake to a stop as you select the proper gear. There is no one correct answer here. However, one thing I can say with certainty is in a panic situation use what DE Instructors call "Both Feet" meaning full pressure on both pedals, clutch and brake. It's absolutely the fastest way to stop in a panic situation. Remember, if the clutch is engaged the brakes have to stop both the forward momentum of the car as well as the entire drive train. Disengage the drive train and let the brakes do their job.
Well put. In a panic stop you won't have time to think about downshifting. Both feet to lock the wheels and activate the ABS. Then steer. And one additional point: Several people have mentioned using the clutch for braking. That is a no no unless you like replacing clutches regularly. What you are looking for is engine braking--using the compression of the engine to help slow the car. You can use engine braking as you are slowing in a normal manner but you should be blipping the throttle (or using Active Rev Matching) to avoid wear on the clutch. I do this alll the time and never replace clutches. They always last 80,00 to 100,000 miles or more.---Bob
 

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I grew up in a mountainous area, still live in a very hilly area, and, yes, I regularly use engine breaking (sorry, warp ten, I should have said "engine breaking" instead of saying "clutch breaking"). For those of you who do not believe this, go to the Appalachians, or better yet, go to the Rockies, and try this for yourself and see.
 

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I grew up in a mountainous area, still live in a very hilly area, and, yes, I regularly use engine breaking (sorry, warp ten, I should have said "engine breaking" instead of saying "clutch breaking"). For those of you who do not believe this, go to the Appalachians, or better yet, go to the Rockies, and try this for yourself and see.
Absolutely! In many cases it can mean the difference between having brakes at the bottom of the hill and not.

I use it all the time, especially when towing. That's one of the reason modern pickups have the ability to set a maximum gear on the automatic. Both for pulling uphill and engine braking downhill.


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It really depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If it's getting around the track as quickly as possible then no, do all your braking with the brakes and make sure you are downshifting to be in the proper gear to accelerate out of the next turn. If it's running a 6/10ths through the hills then sure, use engine braking on downshifts to scrub some speed instead of braking, it makes for a smoother transition. For normal around town driving downshift when you feel like it or push in the clutch and simply brake to a stop as you select the proper gear.

There is no one correct answer here.

However, one thing I can say with certainty is in a panic situation use what DE Instructors call "Both Feet" meaning full pressure on both pedals, clutch and brake. It's absolutely the fastest way to stop in a panic situation. Remember, if the clutch is engaged the brakes have to stop both the forward momentum of the car as well as the entire drive train. Disengage the drive train and let the brakes do their job.
Makes sense to me!
 

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Yes, I should have said engine breaking...sorry. I think we covered it for the drivers training course....Send it to the printer! ;-). (I mean no offense in that, just a haha)


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