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Hi everyone, I will be receiving my newly built Z51 and was wondering what you all have been doing to break the new car in properly? I have been reading different opinions like driving it like you stole it to keeping it under 4k rpm for the 1st 500 miles etc.. please advise the best procedure?
 

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Hi everyone, I will be receiving my newly built Z51 and was wondering what you all have been doing to break the new car in properly? I have been reading different opinions like driving it like you stole it to keeping it under 4k rpm for the 1st 500 miles etc.. please advise the best procedure?
Here is what I plan on doing when I get my Stingray. Hopefully one more month I will have, fingers crossed!

How to Properly Break-In Your New 2014 Corvette Stingray
 

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I replaced the rings in an engine myself about a year ago and looked into this quite a bit. What I found was a lot of varied opinions. The advice I settled on was running it hard in short bursts. Essentially, you want to "physically wear the new piston rings into the cylinder wall until a compatible seal between the two is achieved." This take high pressure in the cylinders, which you will not achieve keeping under xxxx rmps, as GM (and every other manufacturer) suggests. What you want to avoid, however, is the cylinder wall glazing over with overheated oil and thereby preventing that interfacing. So you don't want to run it hard for long periods.

So if it were my new car, I would nail it on the on ramps, but I wouldn't do laps at the track in the first ~500 miles. A manufacturer will never tell you to run it hard, of course, for liability reasons.

More detailed information:
New Engine Break-in Procedure

More fun reading:
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

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Personally, I break all my street engines in by driving how I'd normally drive, with the exception of holding a steady rpm, this needs to vary. I use break-in oil ( like Roush break-in oil) it has a unique way of encapsulating the foreign material that comes from the cylinder wall initial wear, suspends it, and it will flow out at the first oil change, ensuring there will be the minimal contaminants left over to cause wear.
Now then, My racing engines get assembled, and brutally beaten into submission, as they get tore down between rounds for inspection and bearing replacement.
 

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I replaced the rings in an engine myself about a year ago and looked into this quite a bit. What I found was a lot of varied opinions. The advice I settled on was running it hard in short bursts. Essentially, you want to "physically wear the new piston rings into the cylinder wall until a compatible seal between the two is achieved." This take high pressure in the cylinders, which you will not achieve keeping under xxxx rmps, as GM (and every other manufacturer) suggests. What you want to avoid, however, is the cylinder wall glazing over with overheated oil and thereby preventing that interfacing. So you don't want to run it hard for long periods.

So if it were my new car, I would nail it on the on ramps, but I wouldn't do laps at the track in the first ~500 miles. A manufacturer will never tell you to run it hard, of course, for liability reasons.

More detailed information:
New Engine Break-in Procedure

More fun reading:
Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power
My opinion for what it's worth is this method. Drive it like you stole it the first few hundred miles with the right oil. Syn. thereafter.Check out the C7 oil ingestion thread by tuner boost. Makes lots of sense to me. Here it is . Enjoy the articles and your machine!

What happens now days is these engines come prefilled with M1 full synthetic, a superior oil that provides excellent protection from friction, etc. This is great for an engine that is already broken in and rings have seated properly, but it also makes the ring seating to begin with a crap shoot (GM still has excess oil consumption as the #1 warranty related service visit) as this initial period from new the rings and cylinder walls need to "wear in" to each other for a good seal. After 400-500 miles a very hard glaze sets in and then there can no longer be any further seating (we seat rings and break-in our race motors 2 runs down the track, street engines the first 100-200 miles, and rarely ever have anything but the best ring seating one could hope for).

Here is what happens when an engine is not run hard enough to create enough load on the rings to overcome the lubrication provided by the oil used:



In the old days, and still today with aviation engines that the pilots life depends on it, break in oil (a conventional mineral based) came pre-filled and it provided enough protection for the bearings and journals IF driven easy the first 500-1000 mile, yet allowed enough friction for the cross hatch hone to seat the rings properly. It was then critical to drain and fill with a good oil and then could be driven hard. If you went from the showroom to the race track with break-in oil back then you stood a good chance of spinning a bearing or worse.

Today, marketing has conditioned the buyer to get in the new car and aside from put gas in, never open the hood or consider doing any maintenance until 10k or so miles when a DIC message prompts them to do so, so this has resulted in all the re-ring jobs since 1997 when the LS1 was first introduced (that and the piston slap that was addressed with coated skirts) and GM to this day takes the stance that "consumption of 1 qt of oil per 1500 miles is considered normal" when there is no way this should occur.

So, aside from immediately draining the syn oil before driving your new car and filling with conventional to aid ring seat, driving it hard (not unsafe, not abusing it) for several full throttle accelerations, and deceleration (rings need to be loaded with both for proper BMPE to seat properly) one can then drain and change oil/filter to remove break-in debris and be confidant that the rings have seated properly and oil consumption at a minimum, and power at a maximum. The heat cycling process is also critical, during this first 50 miles stop a few times and let the engine cool and then continue.

Now we recommend driving easy the first 50 miles so the ring and pinon mesh properly and the brake pads bed as well, but other than that, there is no real critical drivetrain parts needing any break-in.

Here are some links to back this up for the skeptics (remember, the engineers don't write the owners manual):

This one probably the most informative and detailed:

http://www.tcmlink.com/visitors/carenfeed/brkin.pdf

Proper Engine Break-In - AVweb Features Article

Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power



New Engine Break-in Procedure
 

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Hi everyone, I will be receiving my newly built Z51 and was wondering what you all have been doing to break the new car in properly? I have been reading different opinions like driving it like you stole it to keeping it under 4k rpm for the 1st 500 miles etc.. please advise the best procedure?
Just picked mine up a couple of weeks ago and have about 150 miles on it. My assumption is that the engineers at GM know way more about the car than I do, so I am sticking by their recommendations to the T.
 

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Hi everyone, I will be receiving my newly built Z51 and was wondering what you all have been doing to break the new car in properly? I have been reading different opinions like driving it like you stole it to keeping it under 4k rpm for the 1st 500 miles etc.. please advise the best procedure?
The "drive it like you stole it" is NOT how I break in engines.

Follow the manufacture's recommendations.
 

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People will have their opinions about how to get the job done right as expressed above. I can find something to agree with in almost everything posted above with some exception. To me the most important part of proper engine break-in is to me the most difficult to do. That is the avoidance of running the same engine RPM for extended periods of time. I would think that job is even more difficult to do with the auto-tranny, but certainly possible. We should not forget that the engine is not the only thing that requires a "break-in" period. There are many parts of the drive line that need to mate together and brakes require a fair amount of attention as well to avoid glazing or other irregularities. Just read the manual and heed what makes sense to you.
 

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Picked my Z51 up at museum last weeks and drove home (750miles). One thing that I couldn't believe, the car knows you don't have 500 miles and the redline on the tach is 4500. Once you cross 500 mile the redline automatically jumps to 6500. I also did not hold one speed for any length of time. Also, when you start the engine cold the redline goes down and slowly rises until operating temp is reached. The technology on this car is amazing.
 

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Picked my Z51 up at museum last weeks and drove home (750miles). One thing that I couldn't believe, the car knows you don't have 500 miles and the redline on the tach is 4500. Once you cross 500 mile the redline automatically jumps to 6500. I also did not hold one speed for any length of time. Also, when you start the engine cold the redline goes down and slowly rises until operating temp is reached. The technology on this car is amazing.
Very interesting can't wait for mid April to get here so I can see all these things for myself!
 

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Just picked mine up a couple of weeks ago and have about 150 miles on it. My assumption is that the engineers at GM know way more about the car than I do, so I am sticking by their recommendations to the T.
Unfortunately, this is a logical fallacy ("appeal to authority" to be exact). Just because someone at GM (Engineer? Marketing? Lawyers? Who knows?) wrote them, does not make them right. I encourage you to do your own research and reasoning rather than blindly believe. There is plenty of evidence out there to consider, even without leaving the comfort of your computer desk.
 

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People will have their opinions about how to get the job done right as expressed above. I can find something to agree with in almost everything posted above with some exception. To me the most important part of proper engine break-in is to me the most difficult to do. That is the avoidance of running the same engine RPM for extended periods of time. I would think that job is even more difficult to do with the auto-tranny, but certainly possible. We should not forget that the engine is not the only thing that requires a "break-in" period. There are many parts of the drive line that need to mate together and brakes require a fair amount of attention as well to avoid glazing or other irregularities. Just read the manual and heed what makes sense to you.
Run the automatics strictly with paddle shifters for the first 500 miles so you can choose the gear/RPMs to vary.
 

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"...for several full throttle accelerations, and deceleration (rings need to be loaded with both for proper BMPE to seat properly)"

Which ever break in method you choose is up to you, but I know for certain from back in my drag race engine building days that the above is necessary. It is logical that you must load both sides of the piston rings and accelerationa deceleration is the only way to do so. I have done this with every new vehicle I have owned since the mid 1970s and am doing the so on my new Stingray. You can easily do this and follow the break in instructions in the owner's manual.
 

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Good point, Scott. So it sounds like whether you want to run it hard in bursts or keep it reigned in, all the sources seem to be agreeing to vary RPMs and mix engine acceleration and deceleration.
 

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Unfortunately, this is a logical fallacy ("appeal to authority" to be exact). Just because someone at GM (Engineer? Marketing? Lawyers? Who knows?) wrote them, does not make them right. I encourage you to do your own research and reasoning rather than blindly believe. There is plenty of evidence out there to consider, even without leaving the comfort of your computer desk.
I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with anyone here, just giving my non-mechanic opinion. I am a layperson when it comes to engine dynamics and have to rely on others for their expertise. That being said, I have done the research, and unfortunately, it varies as much as the opinions on this thread. With that in mind, I feel the safest bet is to follow GM protocol.


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Just picked mine up a couple of weeks ago and have about 150 miles on it. My assumption is that the engineers at GM know way more about the car than I do, so I am sticking by their recommendations to the T.
Well, you have to remember that the engineers are not writing the owners manuals for these cars and if you spoke with an engineer that designs these engines you may be surprised to find out how they break in their personal cars. The truth is these owners manuals are written for the MASSES and some of these owners don't even know the difference between a piston ring and a key ring, They have to keep it very simple and safe and keep all aspects in consideration to avoid legal pitfalls. Imagine what would happen in this lawsuit happy country if they didn't. I think GM or any manufacturer would rather keep it safe and simple and then deal with the occasional owner who cannot understand why their car is using a quart of oil every 1500 miles and simply tell them its normal. Yes it is normal if you don't properly seat your rings when the engine is brand new. If you are ok with that then follow the manual to a T.
 

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"...for several full throttle accelerations, and deceleration (rings need to be loaded with both for proper BMPE to seat properly)"
QUOTE]

Scott53, I'm assuming you can still do all this and keep it under the recommended 4000 RPMs that GM recommends...

I have 150 miles on it already and have "gotten on it", but kept it under the 4000 RPMs. Are you all saying that isn't necessary during the "several full throttle accelerations and decelerations"? Are the to rings already fully seated by the 150 miles?


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I would think the folks that designed these engines didn't call it a day at that point and head up for the house. I would imagine it is as important to them as it is us to get the most out of these 6.2's. I've never had a poor performing short lived engine by following the break in guidelines from the manufacture. I've owned over 50 new cars..
 

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How much break-in is already done on the engine even before it is married to the chassis? I thought they ran these engines on stands to get some wear and seating on them, and then drained the oil (to get the metal filings out). Then they put the engine on the chassis a few weeks later. Also, I thought this was why it is no longer required to change the oil the first time until a regular service interval.

Am I incorrect in any or all of the aspects above?
 
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