Stingray Corvette Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
21 - 40 of 163 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,453 Posts
Honestly, unless you are a cretin idiot and somehow super baby the car or choose the opposite extreme, you will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
"Scott53, I'm assuming you can still do all this and keep it under the recommended 4000 RPMs that GM recommends..."

Yes, you can. I have been very careful to stay under 4000 RPMs when doing the acceleration portion. I am not smarter than a GM engineer and will not go against what the manual instructs for max break in RPMs in the first 500 miles. I must admit that the deceleration part was easier with my M6 GS than it is with my A6 Stingray. But I still think it is worth doing and I don't see how it would do any harm. And it does keep you driving at varying speeds per the insturctions in the manual. I hit 178 miles this evening. I'm not certain for how many more miles this makes sense. I'll probably keep this up to at least the 200 to 300 mile mark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
How much break-in is already done on the engine even before it is married to the chassis? I thought they ran these engines on stands to get some wear and seating on them, and then drained the oil (to get the metal filings out). Then they put the engine on the chassis a few weeks later. Also, I thought this was why it is no longer required to change the oil the first time until a regular service interval.

Am I incorrect in any or all of the aspects above?
I don't know the answer to your question, but it certainly is an interesting point. I know that during my VIP Plant Tour in Spetember 2011 I did see them crank the speed up to about 80 MPH with the rear tires on rollers near the end of the entire process. And they did not seem shy about running it up to 80 quickly if my memory is correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
If you change to a conventional 5-30 dexos approved oil for the first 500 miles that would not be a warranty issue would it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,453 Posts
Pretty good idea!
I have written this before but if you have an automatic, this is the way to break it in.....
1. Take a long trip
2. Take it up to 70 and put the cruise control on
3. Put it in M and start using the paddles
4. Every 10 - 15 min, shift between 6, 5 and 4, and back up....

Done....it's the rpm that matters, not speed.....this also kills AFM for breakin......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,225 Posts
I have written this before but if you have an automatic, this is the way to break it in.....
1. Take a long trip
2. Take it up to 70 and put the cruise control on
3. Put it in M and start using the paddles
4. Every 10 - 15 min, shift between 6, 5 and 4, and back up....

Done....it's the rpm that matters, not speed.....this also kills AFM for breakin......
The first time I asked for something like that 3-4 months ago (when I didn't know how to force all eight cylinders to run during the break-in period) was, as best as I can recall, the first time you told me to stop overthinking things. :) Now you have the perfect solution. :D LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,453 Posts
I still feel that way...break-in is way over thought..but if you are OCD, this is the way to do it....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,225 Posts
I definitely have OCD, there is no doubt about that...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Te glen e method may break in the engine but the differential, wheel bearings and u joints need break in also with varying mph. Further the mph should not exceed 55 for the first 300 miles The method I learned 40 years ago is to accelerate up to 55 mph then coast back to 40-45, and repeat for 500 miles. Varying the gear should be performed but keep the rpms within recommendations. The acceleration and coasting aid seating of the rings.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
18,663 Posts
Had the fortune to meet the C5 Chief Engineer Dave Hill, and we ended up talking about break in procedures. He said, as posted above, that varying RPM's during the first 500 miles was key, and that so were: breaking in/burnishing brakes as per the manual, easing in the the tires the first 200 miles so they were similarly broken in as the mold release was worn off, but that his biggest concern was folks not going full bore on the differential, wheel bearings and similar rear end drive components for 1,200 miles, i.e., no track use during this time period.

He also chuckled when I said to him, after my initial oil and filter change at 500 miles (which he personally liked), that I still change my oil thereafter every 3,000 miles. In his typical gentle style, he said, "it's your money, spend it the way you want, but I change mine much less frequently."
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
631 Posts
All I can say is having built race and performance engines for over 40 years, and starting as a GM tech in 1974, and also seeing so many with oil consumption issues since GM started to pre-fill the V8's w/M1, I would never baby it that first 500 miles. It is critical to seat the rings properly, and the superior protection of a full synthetic oil makes this very difficult to achieve this unless you drain and fill with a conventional oil first.



This is long, but Nissan actually breaks each engine in on the track BEFORE delivery to the customer, as does Ferrari, etc.

New Engine Break-in Procedure

Welcome to Continental Motors

Engine Break-In Procedure


The concern with other mating surfaces in the drivetrain is not valid EXCEPT for the ring and pinion and brake pads/rotors. The pads need to be bedded properly (a few brisk stops and NOT allowing the pads to remain clamped to the rotor for even bedding and heat cycling). They generally bed themselves fine. And the Ring and Pinion. These will take app 50-100 limes to "wear in" to each other and a few heat cycles, every other part will never be as true and perfect as when it leaves the factory and there is no need for breaking on any other component.

So, from a tech and engine builders view, most would rather seat the rings properly to begin with than come back for warranty claims requiring a re-ring later due to excess oil consumption.

It seems only Aircraft engines now come pre-filled with proper break-in oil that facilitates proper ring seat. And the pilots and passengers lives depend on this being done correctly.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
18,663 Posts
Valid points.

Can only provide my personal and very limited experience with my brand new C5 and C6 Z06. I followed GM's break in procedures exactly, and despite many other C5's and C6's experiencing lots of severe oil consumption issues -- with more than a few going back to dealerships with owners complaining about a quart of oil needing to be added at 500 miles, 700 miles, etc., I never added, nor needed to add a quart of oil to my C5 between its 3,000 mile oil changes, nor in my C6 Z06 with its 3,000 mile oil changes.

On both, I did one additional oil/filter change, replacing the factory oil and filter at 500 miles to get out all the minute metal particles from initial engine break in. Lucky? Perhaps. Will I do exactly the same thing on my '15 Z06? Absolutely -- unless GM changes the break in procedures for the LT4.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
631 Posts
You were a luck one for sure, and plenty of others doing the same have had no issues so thats proof your not guranteed to use oil....but the hard break-in is assurance the rings will seat correctly.

I also wanted to point out that it was mentioned U-joints and wheel bearings, etc would need break-in. The C7 has no u-joints in any part of the drivetrain and the sealed wheel bearings are a cartridge type assy and will never be more perfect than when new, so that does not apply either.

:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
You were a luck one for sure, and plenty of others doing the same have had no issues so thats proof your not guranteed to use oil....but the hard break-in is assurance the rings will seat correctly.

I also wanted to point out that it was mentioned U-joints and wheel bearings, etc would need break-in. The C7 has no u-joints in any part of the drivetrain and the sealed wheel bearings are a cartridge type assy and will never be more perfect than when new, so that does not apply either.

:thumbsup:

Well mine should be seated well.

Thanks,
booie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,656 Posts
Mine will get driven back to Florida from Bowling Green via the TN/NC/GA mountains. I'm pretty sure everything will be bedded, run in and seated quite nicely before the first oil change :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Mine will get driven back to Florida from Bowling Green via the TN/NC/GA mountains. I'm pretty sure everything will be bedded, run in and seated quite nicely before the first oil change :)
Ours will head northeast through West Virgina...I'm sure we will seat them just fine.....on FRIDAY!!!! :)
 
21 - 40 of 163 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top