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Hey guys with these age-related purchase concerns people are having, (too young, too old) I was wondering if it makes sense to get a Stingray while alive or if it makes more sense to wait until death, at least by then there might not be as many constraints on parts right? I also believe you don't need to get insurance if you're dead so that's some more money saved.

Guys the Vette isn't worth $0.00 the minute you sign the paperwork; if you realize at some point that your life would be better without the car you can $ELL IT! Seriously! No guilt or buyer's remose required :) Oh right you can also LEASE it! (And pay less moneys.) Low mileage (10k/yr) lease if you prefer, through a credit union so rates aren't murderous, and you're good to go without an immense commitment. It's not a Lamborghini so it's not nearly as high-risk a decision so stop stressing so much and make yourselves happy.
 

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The Rock of Ages craft center a few miles north of me made this splendid granite Mercedes, which sits on its granite deck in a cemetery in Linden New Jersey. Maybe I will inquire about the cost and availability of a granite C7. At least I would not have to worry about orange peel. Sorry if I seem to be obsessing. Its the result of growing up in a lot of odd locations due to having a father who was scarred by the Great Depression. I call it Great Depression echo effect.

The Mercedes Benz Tombstone | Weird NJ
 

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Rob, my Dad was born in 1928 in rural Appalachia in eastern Kentucky. He said he could look out at the night sky through the cracks in the roof of the house where he grew up. He said the water in the bucket in their little home would freeze over during the nights in winter. They did subsistence farming to survive as they essentially had almost no money.

When he married for the first and only time, it was to Mom, who was significantly younger than he. Although I never experienced it personally (I was the youngest), I heard stories about the family barely having enough food to eat in the decade or so after he and Mom married. Apparently, from what I was told, my oldest siblings ate first, Mom ate next, and Dad took what was left over before going to bed to get some rest before going back to work in the coal mines the next day.

He and Mom were thrifty (out of necessity), and by the time I was born, I always had enough to eat while growing up. However, I never wasted food. To this day, I still eat every crumb on my plate, even if I don't like the taste of the food.

Based on the environments in which we grew up, each of us are very different in how we evaluate wants versus needs, and how conservative we are with our finances. No one can determine for us what we should do, and we cannot determine for others what they should do. All we can do is to say to each other I understand your concerns, have somewhat similar experiences, and think your thought processes are reasonable for your situation.
 
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