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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Could the next generation Corvette be a mid-engined additional line complimenting the C7, OR a traditional front-engined StingRay replacement, or a special edition StingRay, and might it be called the Manta Ray?

Based on the fact that GM has just filed for a "Manta Ray" trademark, and that trademarks have to be used, extended or lost within two years of first filing, might the mid-engined new Corvette line might bear the name Manta Ray? Or, will the StingRay have an special edition called the Manta Ray? All is guesswork outside of GM at this time, other than this actual trademark filing just last week.

Looking at the picture of the back end of the 1960's Manta Ray below, easy to see how this could easily morph into a mid- engined Corvette.

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Here is a 1965 Corvette Manta Ray concept car.

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Corvette Blogger said:
Home News GM / Factory News GM Registers a Trademark for ‘Corvette Manta Ray’
GM Registers a Trademark for ‘Corvette Manta Ray’
NewsGM / Factory NewsRumors & Innuendo
by Keith Cornett - Jun 23, 2015 0 136


GM Registers a Trademark for 'Corvette Manta Ray'

Thanks to some sleuthing of the US Patent and Trademarks database, the writers over at AutoGuide.com have discovered that last week GM filed a trademark application for ‘Corvette Manta Ray’ for use as “Motor land vehicles, namely, automobiles, engines therefor and structural parts thereof”.


The trademark was filed last week by General Motors and you can see the trademark request from the USPTO below:

Chevrolet Registers a Trademark for 'Corvette Manta Ray'

A filing of a trademark by General Motors is no small thing and they can point to future projects coming to fruition like the ‘Corvette Grand Sport’ trademarked in 2008 or the Stingray application filed in 2010.

Chevrolet has used the Manta Ray name previously as a concept car that closely related to the Mako Shark and the Mako Shark II.

The Manta Ray was actually built using the 1965 Mako Shark II (XP-830) as its base and so it retained many of the Mako Shark IIs features which were many. The Mako Shark II set the design standard for the C3 Corvette but as a concept car it included a clamshell hood and an all-aluminum ZL-1 V8.

The Manta Ray had changes to front grill and a new spoiler while the rear received the most dramatic changes including a flying buttress replacing the Mako’s Venetian blinds rear window treatment. The side exhaust pipes were redesigned to be a bit rounder and they were eventually offered on the 1969 Corvette Stingray. Today, the car resides at the GM Heritage Center.
GM Registers a Trademark for 'Corvette Manta Ray' - Corvette: Sales, News & Lifestyle
 

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The mid-engine car looks pretty exotic and expensive--I wonder if it would be a third model added to the Corvette stable to compete with the Ford GT as a $150-200k option?
 

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Could the next generation Corvette be a mid-engined additional line complimenting the C7, OR a traditional front-engined StingRay replacement, or a special edition StingRay, and might it be called the Manta Ray?
Interesting article, thanks, John. If the trademark has to be used within two years, wouldn't that be too soon for the C8 to replace the C7? To me, it seems most likely that the Manta Ray will be a special edition C7 Stingray.
 

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Interesting article, thanks, John. If the trademark has to be used within two years, wouldn't that be too soon for the C8 to replace the C7? To me, it seems most likely that the Manta Ray will be a special edition C7 Stingray.
In reading the different articles, I think they can extend the name Manta Ray if they do not use it in the first two years. They have opened the door and may continue to keep it open if not ready in the initial two year period.
Personally, the name Manta just doesn't sit well with me. Should the Mid engine become reality, I think it would best remain as a Stingray but with Zora or Duntov as a second name or first which ever works best at the time. I also think the current C7 will continue until 2019 production year and in 2020 we will see the changes. We must also bear in mind that the jump in cost for a Mid Engine model would or could be a destroyer in corvette success down the road. I like the idea of the separate model to run in conjunction with the front engine design. This of course would cause a lot of production problems in the BG plant and perhaps another plant will build the Mid Engine. Just a few of my thoughts and I know we are all second or third guessing here and the General will do what he will do no matter what.

How about an Electric Vette called "EEL":confused: Sound crazy? You never know.:eek:

Now I am getting carried away so it is time to shut this down.

STUNG:cool:
 

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If the trademark has to be used within two years, wouldn't that be too soon for the C8 to replace the C7?
Not if they announce formal plans for the C8 mid-engined Manta Ray before this time in 2017. This could then coincide with 2017/2018 model year production (which all the car rags have been predicting).

I'm drooling already.
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The Plan
"The C8 flagship, the Zora ZR1, will debut the new mid-engine architecture. Launching as a 2017 model, it will define the top of the Corvette hierarchy just as its precursors did in the 1990—1995 C4 generation and 2009—2013 C6 model years. As before, the ZR1 will be low volume, roughly 1500 units per annum, and high priced. We figure around $150,000. It’ll be a stand-alone special that will peacefully coexist in Chevy showrooms with C7 models for a few years. The new platform, with appropriate bodywork and cockpit changes, could also support a revived Cadillac XLR (with *better sales success than the last one, we hope). By 2020, we expect the C7 to take its rightful place in the National Corvette/Sinkhole Museum and that all future models–yes, even the base Corvette–will shift to the mid-engine platform.*" C8 Chevrolet Corvette Exclusive! What to Expect from the Heart-stopping Mid-Engined Zora! ? Feature ? Car and Driver
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*If this is true, the C7 will be the last front-engined Corvette ever produced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Car and Driver, you are so wrong, IMO in one of your major conclusions, that the new mid-engined C8 will replace and eliminate C7 and all future front-engined Corvettes! Wrong, for SO many reasons...

First and most important, eliminating a $55,000 base Corvette and replacing it with a minimum of a $150,000 base Corvette would lose about 98% of your Corvette historical buyers, as very, very, very few of Corvette's, current annual 35,000 buyers can afford to spend that amount on their next Corvette.

Second, why add 450,000 square to Bowling Green Asembly Plant (increasing its current size by 50%), to produce even 1,500 mid-engined C8's does not make any economic sense. (Let alone that Car and Driver is wildly overestimating the amount of ZORA's to be produced, and many others think such production would be limited to probably about 500 mid-engined units per year.)

A much more reasoned, financially-cost-justifiable future is that a mid-engined C8 is built in the 450,000 square feet vacated in a year or two, when the new paint shop is completed as an addition to the Plant, and that the mid-engine Corvette, called ZR1, ZORA, Manta Ray or whatever, is produced on a second, newly-created assembly line. That new assembly line will be built in the 450,000 square feet of vacated space (remember the Cadillac Allante's separate production line), and that Bowling Green Assembly would then produce, for the 2018 model year, simultaneously, both a $55,000 front engined C7 AND a limited production, combined ZORA/Cadillac super sports car on the second assembly line (for we all remember that twice in the past four months, the next head of Cadillac has talked about an upcoming world class sports car being added to its line down with a few years).

Lastly, Car and Driver is wrong that the mid-engined Corvette replaces the front engined C7, for the total profit being made on 35,000 current/annual C7 sales far exceeds what would be made on even 1,500, $150,000-200,000 mid-engined cars (even if GM's makes a "triple killing" on every mid-engine car), because the key in keeping car costs manageable is to spread parts and systems development costs over as many car units as possible. The development costs of a new mid-engined world class sports car are huge, and thus those costs must be spread as far and wide, over as many units as possible, including some of those development costs for specific parts and system improvement enhancements also being amortized when the next generation front-engined Corvettes arrives in the 2020 model year. For example, the Ford GT is going to start at $400,000 for just 250 units per year. Ford does not have the economies of scale of producing that new car within the confines of a functioning major assembly Plant. Conversely, Corvette will have, by using for instance, the current dashboard/panel sub-assembly (IP) area at the Plant, which is now making 35,000 IP's each year, could easily, and with limited additonal expenditures, make 500 additional IP's for the mid-engined car, albeit with fancier and costlier leather, etc.
 

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Car and Driver, you are so wrong, IMO in one of your major conclusions, that the new mid-engined C8 will replace and eliminate C7 and all future front-engined Corvettes! Wrong, for SO many reasons...
:)

I appreciate the passion you have on this subject, and I agree with most of your perspectives and points.

One thing that isn't clear to me is why a mid-engined Corvette can only be mass produced if it sells for over $150,000...

What's so special about the mid-engine arrangement that dictates a 500+HP Corvette can't be mass-produced (30,000+ units annually) for $70,000?

Will the engine cost an additional $20,000 per unit if placed mid-ship? Will the new transaxle likewise only be "buildable" at $15,000 per unit?

It seems to me that the existing state-of-the-art C7 technology can be largely adapted and "repackaged" into a mid-engine platform, mass produced, and become the heir to the Corvette legacy.

Still, I love the front-engined Corvettes (particularly the C7!), and I would be happy enough if they would begin limited production of the C8 mid-engine Zora (woops - Manta Ray). For all the reasons you mentioned, now seems to be as likely a time as any (in the past) for this to occur.

I've got my fingers crossed. :)
 

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Since Chevrolet has already achieved 50/50 front/rear weight balance with the C7, hasn't it realized the main advantage of a mid-engine layout? Why would it now make sense to develop a mid-engine Corvette?
 

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I remember when the "Tampa Rays" were first called the "Devil Rays". I always liked the Devil Ray name best. Maybe GM will capatilize?
 

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Well you don't have to call me Manta Ray, you can call me Sting Ray, or Ray Ray, or Jay Jay, or Ray Manta, or Ray Sting, or Manta Sting, or Sting Sting.............
 

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Or you can just call me Jay!
 
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