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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a track day coming up on Saturday with 2800 miles on the car.
The manual is quite clear about running the 10W-50 full syn for this application. Previous experience would have me believe that amount of time if a bit premature to throw in synthetic as the motor seats in.
At the same time, I would be concerned about viscosity break down of the standard oil during a track application.
Anyone have thoughts on going synthetic at 2800 miles potentially affecting proper engine break-in?
Thanks,
Mike
 

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Corvettes came with fully synthetic Mobil 1 for the fifth generation and part of the sixth generation -- before Mobil 1 became a semi-syn oil. Ferrari's and Porsches also came from the factory with fully synthetic Mobil 1 for decades before Mobil 1 changed.

Would personally follow the StingRay track prep sheets from GM that have been posted here.

http://www.stingrayforums.com/forum/stingray-corvette-discussions/2245-preparation-track-use.html
I believe Mobil 1 switched to a group 3 / 4 base stock blend long before GM stopped using them as a factory fill. Everyone gets hung up over the base stock blend and the term full synthetic but Mobil 1 is still some of the best oil you can put in your crankcase.


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What brand does the Bowling Green factory use now? I know it is Dexos certified, but what company makes it?
 

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What brand does the Bowling Green factory use now? I know it is Dexos certified, but what company makes it?
My guess is there is more than one company making the private label DEXOS oils.


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I am so far from being a track expert. At the same time, have never seen a tire pressure expressed in other than a cold temperature, a "not moved for hours" measurement. Would love trackguy and others more knowledgeable to respond.
 

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Tire pressures are cold and although 26lbs seems quite low I've heard it's pretty close to optimal with Z51 package. I imagine the stiffness of the run flat sidewalls plays a role. Watch the temps as you run, they should rise at most 6 degrees if the starting pressure is correct for the track and your driving style.

<edit: changed 4 to 6 after talking to some friends>
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
In racing, we've always had cold starting tire pressures which would ultimately hope to get us to the optimal hot pressure settings. If over the hot pressure preference, you simply reduce some air. Not knowing hot pressure settings makes this a challenge.
 

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In racing, we've always had cold starting tire pressures which would ultimately hope to get us to the optimal hot pressure settings. If over the hot pressure preference, you simply reduce some air. Not knowing hot pressure settings makes this a challenge.
I've heard 32 lbs is optimal with the run flats. 36-38 with standard sidewalls. The trick is getting just enough pressure to keep from rolling over the sidewalls so you keep the entire tread in contact with the road. Too much pressure and you start to lose traction, it's a balancing act. Too little pressure and you generate too much tread heat, that's why a pressure/pyrometer is so popular.


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Elegant- regarding track prep....the recommended air pressures- I assume they are cold pressures?
Don't make any assumptions. Get out the tire marker (grease pen, chalk, paint pen, or even a regular marker or highlighter will do), draw a couple lines on the tires from sidewall to tread before you go out, and see how far down the sidewall it is going. After the next session, add air if you are coming too far down the sidewall or remove air if you aren't using all the tread. Remark and repeat until you get dialed in.

This method won't tell you whether your suspension is set up right (camber, caster, toe, etc), you'll need a thermometer for that, but it will at least let you get the maximum grip for what you did show up to the track with.
 
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Most accurate way to set up tires and alignment (caster, camber, toe) is with taking tire temperatures. Run the car for base line bringing tires up to temperature and then immediately go to pit with someone waiting to record values. Then take 3 readings on each tire (inside, middle, and outside) ASAP. Call tire mfg. for optimal temp and operating pressure. This is also helpful with balancing the corner weight.
 
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