Stingray Corvette Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Z06/Z07 -A8 package on order at a dealer (deposit made and on the list), thus it hasn't been submitted. I changed the order for a museum delivery at a cost of $990 and received a new purchase order to sign and return. I notice the delivery charge of $995 is still on the PO. The car will never go to the dealer that I ordered it from, so why the destination charge? Does the museum delivery still have a destination charge? There is also a $129 administrative fee, $129 clerical fee, $121 document transmittal service and a $200 out of state service fee. All normal charges?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,282 Posts
Every Stingray purchased includes the same delivery charge of $995 whether it is traveling cross country or cross the road from the factory to the NCM. It is a standardized charge and part of every new car order. The admin and other fees are your dealer fees and may be negotiable. The $990 NCM is complete and well worth it, includes your plant tour, museum tour, personal guide and very careful PDI by the NCM.
 
  • Like
Reactions: elegant

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
MacMulkin has no documentation fees whatsoever. The supplier price that came off the web site is my out the door price. I am taking care of my own registration and title cost in my home state of Vermont. They are supplying me with a temporary NH plate, which I think is good for 15 days. There is nothing on my order sheet for this temporary plate. If they try to collect its cost from me, I will not be upset.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
18,669 Posts
A little "back story" on how/why the DFC charge (delivery freight charge) was originally standardized throughout the country.

Prior to the mid/late 1970s, dealers closer to the factory paid a much lower DFC then dealers further away -- even when selling the identical car or truck. Dealers closer to major automotive factories were happy, for often customers would drive hundreds of miles to go to those "close in dealers" and pay less for the identical vehicle than from a dealer located in their home town. Remember my Dad doing exactly that.

Clearly there were a small number of happy, "close in" automotive dealers, and a huge number of unhappy ones (losing customers to dealerships right near/next to factories).

Majority rules, and has a consequence it became a national platform of the National Automotive Dealers Association (NADA) to eliminate this competitive disadvantage/advantage (depending on where your dealership and your factory were located). NADA went to the US Congress and got a law passed that nationally-standardized vehicle delivery charges for each type of vehicle. Believe that law was passed in 1978. It has, as you can imagine, interesting consequences. For example, if you currently live in Hawaii, you pay the same $995 delivery charge for your 2015 Corvette as does someone who lives in Bowling Green.

(This is a history "back story" only post, not a political one. Hint, hint.)
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top