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My Z51 C7 now has about 1100 miles of South Florida driving. After warm-up (say 10-15 miles), the large analog gauge on the lower right of the display indicates 220 degrees. But if you toggle up the performance icon and get the functions listing (near the center of the tach circle) the top line-engine temperature - reads lower. Somewhere between 180 and 200. Never has matched the analog needle indication of 220. What am I missing here? Different sensor locations?
 

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Oil temp vs. water temp?
That would also be my first guess as well. There are so many options for the screen that it is easy to think you have the water gauge up when it's really the oil temp gauge and vice versa.
 

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My oil temp seems pretty high..does anyone know what it is supposed to be for normal driving? ImageUploadedByTapatalk1400198046.653867.jpg
 

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My Z51 C7 now has about 1100 miles of South Florida driving. After warm-up (say 10-15 miles), the large analog gauge on the lower right of the display indicates 220 degrees. But if you toggle up the performance icon and get the functions listing (near the center of the tach circle) the top line-engine temperature - reads lower. Somewhere between 180 and 200. Never has matched the analog needle indication of 220. What am I missing here? Different sensor locations?
If you are comparing the 'engine temp' readout in the touring dash in perf mode then yes you are correct.

The big analog gauge will sit rock solid at 220 where the numbers read between 200-217 or so. Most likely the analog gauge is kind on an idiot gauge, it never moves off the exact same spot where the engine temp numbers vary 10* or so while driving.
 

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My oil temp seems pretty high..does anyone know what it is supposed to be for normal driving? View attachment 7369
Oil temp in normal driving should run around 220. This is completely different from water temp which will run in the 200 - 210 range.

FYI, oil temp is designed to exceed 212 to vaporize any residual moisture trapped by condensation.
 

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Oil temp in normal driving should run around 220. This is completely different from water temp which will run in the 200 - 210 range.

FYI, oil temp is designed to exceed 212 to vaporize any residual moisture trapped by condensation.

Correct and excellent explanation. Just would add un-burnt fuel to the list. Cheers!
 

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Thanks for the information! Just want to make sure all my gauges are reading correctly... They just look so much higher than the average car we would drive back in the day..
 

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Thanks for the information! Just want to make sure all my gauges are reading correctly... They just look so much higher than the average car we would drive back in the day..
Actually, the average car does not have an oil temp gauge. Don't confuse oil temp with water temp. But, to your point, water temps have risen significantly over the last 15 - 20 years as emission standards have risen. 160 used to be the gold standard for water temp in a high performance engine. Now it's 200 - 210...... :(
 

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Since driving my 2014 Z-51 Stingray off the showroom floor down here at southwest Florida three months ago, since day one my concern has been the analog water temperature gauge running up to 220 degrees indicated, then literally freezing at 220 degrees. Once at 220 degrees indicated it doesn't go up, it doesn't go down, for as long as the LT-1 engine is hot. I've never experienced a water temperature gauge freezing on my preceding five Corvettes. With the engines warmed up the water temperature in my earlier Corvettes' would fluctuate between 195 to 212 degrees with both the analog water temperature and digital water temperature gauges (digital via C5 and C6 Corvette DICs'), dependent upon engine load, ambient air temperature and humidity, if my Corvettes' were running or sitting at a stop sign and especially if when sitting at a stop sign my air conditioner was running or not.

There have been suggestions that the author of this thread may be confusing water temperature gauges against oil temperature gauges with the C7 Corvette. In fact, since "SeaBear" opened this thread regarding C7 Corvette water temperature concerns, this thread has shifted from a water temperature issue to an oil temperature issue. Well, folks, "SeaBear" is correct: "SeaBear" is not mixing water temperature gauges with oil temperature gauges. "SeaBear" is talking about a water temperature concern, the exact same concern I'm experiencing with my C7 Corvette, too.

Yes, the beauty of the C7 Corvette's instrument panel is it combines three analog gauges (fuel, water temperature and speedometer (the minimum gauges needed to "comfortably" get to your local Corvette's service department should the eight-inch HD display die)) with a user configurable instrument panel on a eight-inch HD screen. I prefer the "Sport" mode, but there doesn't appear to be a user configurable HD water temperature gauge available via "Sport" mode, which means I have to rely on the analog water temperature gauge. But, and as I believe "Seabear" was trying to explain, if you select the "Tour" mode HD display, you can configure "Tour" mode where to the right of "Tour" mode's HD tachometer, HD instruments in digital format can be displayed. A HD water temperature digital gauge is listed at the top, the HD tire pressure status listed at the bottom of the column of instrument readings. With my C7 Corvette the digital water temperature readout fluctuates as I would expect, the readings between 198 to 210 degrees while the analog water temperature gauge sits frozen at 220 degrees.

I executed a test to see what happens when a cold LT-1 engine is warming up in my driveway while monitoring "Touring" mode's HD digital water temperature gauge versus the analog water temperature gauge. It appears the analog water temperature gauge is not a true analog gauge. Instead of sweeping smoothly and continuously up to 220 degrees, it "ticks", much like the "seconds" hand of a wrist watch. The analog temperature gauge's needle "ticks" up a few degrees, stops, "ticks" up a few degrees, stops, this process repeated until 220 degrees is reached and the gauge freezes. This ticking action suggests the analog water temperature gauge is in reality a digital water temperature gauge (the importance of this distinction will be explained shortly). When the analog water temperature gauge reaches and freezes at 220 degrees, the "Touring" mode HD digital water temperature gauge is reading just 183 degrees, a 17 degree difference between the two gauges. As LT-1 engine warm up continues, the "Touring" mode HD digital water temperature gauge continues up to 198 - 210 degrees while the analog water temperature gauge stays frozen at 220 degrees.

This is a problem, especially if I'm correct that a HD water temperature gauge is not available in "Sport" mode. Even if a HD water temperature gauge is available in "Sport" mode you are less one engine function you can monitor if you can't trust the analog water temperature gauge. I've been driving for just over 50 years. I've gone through my share of leaking water pumps, broken fan belts and busted water hoses. In all of these undesired engine cooling failures the temperature gauges rose dramatically where I could pull over and deal with the problem before serious engine damage. With the current situation where the analog water temperature gauge freezes in my C7 Corvette at 220 degrees, what if any of the three failing scenarios I've just described occurs? Is my analog water temperature gauge going to rise above 220 degrees to indicate the problem, or is it going to stay frozen at a false 220 degrees? Granted, with a single serpentine belt controlling most engine functions with today's modern engines the driver is going to know something is wrong. But that's not the point. In my opinion this is a problem that Chevrolet engineers' have to fix.

Earlier I stated that the "ticking" action of the water temperature rising a few degrees at a time suggests the analog water temperature gauge is in reality a digital water temperature gauge. This suggests the analog water temperature gauge is under computer control. If true, then there is the possibility this problem could be fixed via a software fix/patch.

Okay, how many of you C7 Corvette owners out there are experiencing the same problem as I've just described? All of us? The more of you who join in and will bring up this problem with your local Corvette service departments, as I'm going to do during my next oil change, then the better chance we have to get this problem recognized by Chevrolet and resolved.
 

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Just so I don't get an overheat, I'm not concerned. I try not to over analyze the car, and have been happy for 5800 non issue miles.
 

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I have noticed the same thing. The analog gauge hits 220 and never moves. The digital gauge has minor fluctuations based on outside temp and engine load.


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Regarding the thread update, "Just so I don't get an overheat, I'm not concerned.", are you running your C7 in "Tour" mode with this mode configured to display all engine conditions in digital format to the right of the tachometer? If true, then great for you because at least "Tour" mode (and possibly "Track" mode?) appears to be the only mode providing valid water temperature data.

But so far those of us who have updated this thread regarding the analog water temperature gauge in their C7 Corvettes' agree that once the analog water temperature gauge reaches 220 degrees it doesn't budge. As I've stated in my earlier post to this thread I want to run my C7 Corvette in "Sport" mode, which doesn't appear to offer an HD water temperature gauge on the eight-inch LCD screen. That means the analog water temperature gauge is the only water temperature gauge available and right now I'm questioning if it is operating correctly or not. It already shows there is a problem with accuracy: when "Tour" mode's HD digital water temperature gauge reads 183 degrees on my C7 Corvette the analog water temperature gauge is reading 220 degrees. That's just over a 20% error between the two gauges, which for me is not acceptable, especially given the C7 Corvette is a Sport's Car where the accurate display of engine conditions is expected and the Corvette is the most expensive automobile in Chevrolet's stable.

But more important, what if a water cooling failure occurs while running in "Sport" mode, the water temperature reaches engine damaging conditions and that analog water temperature gauge is still reading just 220 degrees? "Just so I don't get an overheat,...", well, how are you going to know if your C7 Corvette has an water temperature overheating problem if you are relying on the analog water temperature gauge and it's stuck on 220 degrees?

My plans are to bring this analog water temperature gauge issue up with my Chevrolet's Service Department when I head in for my next oil change. I am hoping more members of this forum will update this thread with if their C7 Corvette's analog water temperature gauge also freezes at 220 degrees, or not. The more of us who take the time to update this thread, then the better chance I'm going to have getting Chevrolet to investigate this issue, which I'll then then pass on to all of you via this forum thread. Thanks in advance for all of you taking a few minutes to update this thread.
 

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Mine behaves very similar. I think on the way to work this morning it read 185 on digital (Tour mode) and ~220 best I could tell on Analog. 82 outside and driving in mild traffic with AC on. I am running the aero-plate if that matters and VIN is 23,916. I'll post more examples as I get them. Nothing more rediculous than "useless" guages. Maybe the analog guage is meant to be an "idiot" guage?
 

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Here's a picture, worth 1000 words. I need to send this to GM Customer Service.

ImageUploadedByCorvette Stingray Forum1403112351.338305.jpg


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Thanks to everyone for your input regarding this problem. Thanks Mark (mjw930) for adding your excellent picture to this thread. Mark, I hope you do contact GM Customer Service and send them your picture.

With input from everyone taking the time to post to this thread, I believe there is now confirmation that this water temperature issue is a common problem that impacts at least all 2014 Corvettes up to and including my VIN (14784). Last night I took 24 pictures which show the progression of the digital water temperature gauge moving up to 183 degrees indicated on Touring mode's HD performance screen listing all engine functions in digital format when the analog water temperature gauge then froze at 220 degrees indicated, the analog water temperature gauge remaining at 220 degrees indicated while Touring mode's HD performance screen showed water temperature continued up to a maximum of 208 degrees, water temperature then "floating" between 204 to 208 degrees on my 2014 Z51 Corvette.

My plans are to take information from this thread along with the pictures I took last night and edit them into both a Microsoft Word .docx and Adobe .pdf file. I'll product a paper hardcopy, copy the .docx and .pdf files to a flash drive and deliver them to the service manager at the Chevrolet dealer where I bought my Corvette. If my local Chevrolet dealer does not take this problem seriously, then I'll, too, go to GM Customer Service with this problem.

In closing to everyone posting to this thread, I believe in accurate engine gauges, be they analog or digital. I do not believe in idiot lights, period. Some forum members have stated in this thread their concern that Chevrolet may have provided an idiot analog water temperature gauge for the 2014 Corvette. I certainly hope this is not true. Engine gauges are one of the things I like about the Corvette as these days USA automobile builders are shifting to just the fuel and water temperature functions displayed via gauges with all other engine functions displayed via idiot lights. To me if USA automobile builders provide only a water temperature gauge for engine status for many of the automobiles currently built in the USA, then that tells me that at least the water temperature gauge, be it analog or digital, is important. If Porsche or Ferrari were to get wind of this problem with the new 2014 Corvette they'd have more than a laugh or two.
 

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Just so I don't get an overheat, I'm not concerned. I try not to over analyze the car, and have been happy for 5800 non issue miles.

I'm kinda with Glen on this. I want to be able to rely on the analog coolant gauge to indicate a overheat situation cause I have my DIC programmed to show other important info not the digital coolant temp. Will the analog gauge reveal an overheat in the coolant? Has anybody ever seen their analog coolant gauge show above 220? Has anybody ever seen their digital gauge show above 220 while the analog still shows 220? Can I rely on the analog gauge to at least be in the ballpark on coolant temp after warm-up? Is the digital "engine" gauge really a measurement of the coolant temp or something else?

It seems the screen shots all show the gauges prior to the car reaching operating temp as indicated by the digital oil temp. I don't care if there is a difference between the analog and digital coolant gauges for the brief period prior to full warm-up. I think in reality they are both digital anyway. The different configuration/display may be why there is a difference in the read-out. Is there a difference between the analog oil gauge and the digital oil gauge?
 

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I'm kinda with Glen on this. I want to be able to rely on the analog coolant gauge to indicate a overheat situation cause I have my DIC programmed to show other important info not the digital coolant temp. Will the analog gauge reveal an overheat in the coolant? Has anybody ever seen their analog coolant gauge show above 220? Has anybody ever seen their digital gauge show above 220 while the analog still shows 220? Can I rely on the analog gauge to at least be in the ballpark on coolant temp after warm-up?

It seems the screen shots all show the gauges prior to the car reaching operating temp as indicated by the digital oil temp. I don't care if there is a difference between the analog and digital coolant gauges for the brief period prior to full warm-up. I think in reality they are both digital anyway. The different configuration/display may be why there is a difference in the read-out. I don't know.
Good points. I think the only way to be sure of what you're asking would be to pull the coolant sensor and expose it to temperatures exceeding 220F (while attached to the wiring harness). This isn't the easiest thing to do.

There have been known issues with the analog gauge for some time. Is my C7 overheating? If you read through that thread, you can see that the analog gauge high temp reading corresponded to a high voltage reading. Later in the thread, the OP shown another dash photo when the voltage is in the normal range and the analog gauge is close to the digital temp. Could be related to voltage(?)...

So, I'm inclined to fall into glen's "camp" on this one - if it ain't broke don't fix it, and "try not to over analyze the car".
 
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Interesting Mobius. The issue of two different sensors was also brought up in your attachment. So maybe the "engine" digital gauge and the analog coolant gauge are measuring two different things.
 
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