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Discussion Starter #1
If you don't know what clay is, here's a primer:

Auto detailing clay, detail clay bar, clay lubricant, Pinnacle Poly Clay, Wolfgang, auto detail clay, meguiar's detailing clay, auto clay bar

BTW, click back one and you can see all the autogeek how-to's on car detailing - please watch how to wash , use an orbital and wax at the minimum and you will know enuf to keep your Vette nice for years.

The cars come from the factory ready to polish and wax - there is no waiting period,, you can have at them right away. But many have impurities in the paint from being moved around, don't ever think you paint is "good because it's new". So you may need clay.

It's easy to tell if you need to clay - do a "baggie test". Get a ziplock. put your hand in it like a glove and run the bag and your hand over the paint surface.If it feels pretty bumpy like sandpaper, you need clay.

Because it's new it won't need much, I just soap up the car with dawn dishwashing detergent (yes, dawn is OK) and use the soapy water as lubricant for the clay. After a easy wipe over the surface you're ready for a fine polish and then a sealant. A good way to go is Blackfire Total polish and seal and then Blackfire Wet Diamond - both are just a wipe on/buff off - or easier is the blackfire polish and then the Sonax above...
 

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Usually the car picks up those imperfections during rail shipment - metal dust from the wheels and what not.

I would think with the covers, the imperfections would be largely avoided.

Be interesting to see what folks find out when they get theirs and do the baggie test.
 

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The biggest problem is the dealer prep shop putting a wheel on the paint when it's picked up dirt from shipping. I had a black Cayenne ruined by the Porsche prep mechanic, completely swirled, refused delivery and got into a massive argument with the dealer. They finally got it repaired by spending almost $1000 out of their pocket to get the surface re-polished by a local high end bodyshop. They have since changed their PDI steps, they clay the car then use an random orbital with pure wax, no abrasives at all. They used to apply a polish with a standard wheel and in the right hands this can work but now when the PDI mechanic is low man on the totem pole.

They make a big deal out of the PDI done at the NCM, I wonder what products and procedures they use?
 

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Usually the car picks up those imperfections during rail shipment - metal dust from the wheels and what not.

I would think with the covers, the imperfections would be largely avoided.

Be interesting to see what folks find out when they get theirs and do the baggie test.
I was assured yesterday by my Plant contact no cars are going by rail... although we've got some sitting in the rail yard. I was told mine was shipped by rail initially, but that was a mistake. I guess we'll find out the facts at some point.
 

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To check if you need to Clay your car, Grab a Sandwich baggy and put your hand in it and gently rub the car paint if it feels gritty and makes noise you need to clay. After claying the paint surface will be like glass baggy will make no noise. Apply wax after. There are lots of videos on this as well on youtube. I generally Clay 2 times a year as my vehicle sits outside with the elements.

Good Luck
Also DO NOT Wash any car truck with dish detergent it is a wax grease remover and not good for the cars paint.
 

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To check if you need to Clay your car, Grab a Sandwich baggy and put your hand in it and gently rub the car paint if it feels gritty and makes noise you need to clay. After claying the paint surface will be like glass baggy will make no noise. Apply wax after. There are lots of videos on this as well on youtube. I generally Clay 2 times a year as my vehicle sits outside with the elements.

Good Luck
Also DO NOT Wash any car truck with dish detergent it is a wax grease remover and not good for the cars paint.
Actually, sealant makers like Zanno recommend washing with Dawn to remove all the previous wax and sealers before you apply their sealers but yes, it's good advice because I've known people who just use whatever bottled soap they have. I saw one person pour Tide into a bucket, I almost had a coronary. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Actually, sealant makers like Zanno recommend washing with Dawn to remove all the previous wax and sealers before you apply their sealers but yes, it's good advice because I've known people who just use whatever bottled soap they have. I saw one person pour Tide into a bucket, I almost had a coronary. ;)
I knew I would get this..dawn has been used for years..dawn is perfectly fine to STRIP the surface of prior coatings. You can do it any time you want bare paint with no problems...Chemical Guys Cirtrus wash is also a good stripper.
 

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I knew I would get this..dawn has been used for years..dawn is perfectly fine to STRIP the surface of prior coatings. You can do it any time you want bare paint with no problems...Chemical Guys Cirtrus wash is also a good stripper.
I missed a punctuation mark in my paragraph, I meant to say its ONLY for use when you need to strip the paint. We're on the same page. :cool:
 

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I missed a punctuation mark in my paragraph, I meant to say its ONLY for use when you need to strip the paint. We're on the same page. :cool:
That would be the only reason is to have a fresh start. Figured that would be obvious guess not... :cool:
 

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The biggest problem is the dealer prep shop putting a wheel on the paint when it's picked up dirt from shipping. I had a black Cayenne ruined by the Porsche prep mechanic, completely swirled, refused delivery and got into a massive argument with the dealer. They finally got it repaired by spending almost $1000 out of their pocket to get the surface re-polished by a local high end bodyshop. They have since changed their PDI steps, they clay the car then use an random orbital with pure wax, no abrasives at all. They used to apply a polish with a standard wheel and in the right hands this can work but now when the PDI mechanic is low man on the totem pole.
Unfortunately your experience is all too common; the vast majority of dealerships (and body shops) still do have detail technicians with little or no training who use rotary polishers and pads/products not designed to produce high quality results -- they are all about speed. Even letting them wash your new car can result in damage.

They make a big deal out of the PDI done at the NCM, I wonder what products and procedures they use?
NCM's program from what I've observed isn't that much different than a normal dealer's services, aside from using "boutique" chemicals from a company that has partnered/sponsored with them... and generally speaking those products aren't anything all that special.

At the end of the day your single best option to ensure a fresh start is to consult a professional who can give you a good base to work from and guidance for protecting your investment; of course if you feel comfortable doing the work yourself that is also a great option.
 

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Unfortunately your experience is all too common; the vast majority of dealerships (and body shops) still do have detail technicians with little or no training who use rotary polishers and pads/products not designed to produce high quality results -- they are all about speed. Even letting them wash your new car can result in damage.



NCM's program from what I've observed isn't that much different than a normal dealer's services, aside from using "boutique" chemicals from a company that has partnered/sponsored with them... and generally speaking those products aren't anything all that special.

At the end of the day your single best option to ensure a fresh start is to consult a professional who can give you a good base to work from and guidance for protecting your investment; of course if you feel comfortable doing the work yourself that is also a great option.


Charlie is on point here.

Its too early to tell if the revised paint process and however they have handled "prepping" the cars before shipping will make for better paint condition than C6's. Although like Charlie pointed out, the dealer is the bigger of the problems....using cheap and unskilled labor to wash the cars and....ugh dare I say...'detail' them. It would be a VERY good idea to pick up your car immediately following its PDI and BEFORE they wash it. Tell them you want to pick it up dirty. No wash or wipedown of any kind. The moment may not be as special or picturesque, but if you do that and have it professionally detailed by someone who knows what they are doing or do it yourself, those pics will be far more enjoyable and could save you a ton of money. I can't count how many cars I've done and took longer than they should have just because of the horrific dealer prep.

Its also a great time to look into coatings like CQuartz Finest for super long durability and protection since the defects (ie swirls) should hopefully be minimal by the time you get it.
 
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