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Yay! I mean ugh... what is with the shoddy workmanship they keep uncovering.

With my car scheduled for production next week, I wonder if the recall work will still need to be done at the dealer when the revised part is available, or whether they've got enough to move forward with properly assembled vehicles from the get-go next week. :-|

Haven't had a GM car in a while... will be interesting to see how the Vette fares compared to my Subaru when it comes to these sorts of things. Both are pretty much all-new models as of last year.
 

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Yay! I mean ugh... what is with the shoddy workmanship they keep uncovering. With my car scheduled for production next week, I wonder if the recall work will still need to be done at the dealer when the revised part is available, or whether they've got enough to move forward with properly assembled vehicles from the get-go next week. :-
We have yet to see TPW's moving further into the future. If one's car is either now at BGAP, or manufactured hereafter, all those cars currently at the Plant will be fixed before they are shipped. I know us future owners buck like steers at the factory holding cars for a while "after manufactured and before shipped," and this is the reason why, i.e. if they find a defect, the cars are right there and can be fixed while at the Plant, rather than chasing those cars all over the country to have local dealers fix them.

Also disagree with the phrase "shoddy workmanship" if that phrase is directed at BGAP workers, for most of the time problems like these are supplier caused, for example, a "burr" in the supplier built receiving sleeve of the emergency brake cable drum, and/or a small anomaly in the steering wheel's air bag mounting bracket. Hindsight is 20/20 for us all, and the process of assembly 5,000 parts is a complex one. When was the last time any of us performed at 99% efficiency (oh yes, when we were teenagers and exceeded that level...).
 

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i bot my first 2002 ferrari 360 in 2005, it had 550 miles on it, at 2000 miles a valve disintegrated and luckily fell into the oil sump... but it was out of warranty and required a complete engine out rebuild , at a cost of 10k.... it cost about the price of two vettes and so when i see these problems i think they are small and manageable... my 2015 z51 is scheduled for build next week (9-15) so i hope its not delayed... btw i still have the 360 and no further issues...tbob
 
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If one's car is either now at BGAP, or manufactured hereafter, all those cars currently at the Plant will be fixed before they are shipped.
That's preferable to me, of course. Rather have the car in as-close-to-perfect-working-order-as-possible from the start.

Also disagree with the phrase "shoddy workmanship" if that phrase is directed at BGAP workers, for most of the time problems like these are supplier caused
Hahar, putting me on the spot a bit! :) It's a harsh phrase to use, granted. I suppose it's one people will take personally because it implies lack of care (and that's not a fair accusation) so maybe I should say "poor design". As far as where the poor design took place it's really not my concern -- people should take pride in their work regardless of the facility they inhabit, and as long as they own their mistakes and fix things going forward it's all good. Nobody does perfect work -- I should know, I work in software development -- but as long as they want to get better and put in the work to do it they're cool in my book.
 

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Hum... Who is to say that the design was poor?

It is much, much better for the problem to be with one improperly trained employee at the plant, than an engineering design defect ("poor design" as you said) in the part itself. One is easy to correct; the other calls into question all of the cars, and gives a very bad impression on its overall quality, and the abilities of the people (engineers) who created the StingRay.

Since this issue is only with some VINs and not all, I think the root cause was either an improperly trained assembly line employee, or what John said: a bad batch of parts from a supplier.

I seriously don't think (and hope) it is due to a poor design.
 
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2 Recalls for the Stingray

Bad news for some Stingray owners. General Motors has issued another two recalls, making 67 recalls this year. These recalls were for the Corvette Stingray and dealt with problems with the airbag and parking break cables.
The recall due to the airbags affects about 2,000 Stingrays, but most have not reached public consumers. Apparently, the airbag in the driver’s side could, during a crash, separate from the steering week, causing possible injury.

2014-Chevrolet-Corvette-Cyber Gray-6.jpg

About parking break cables, GM said that 800 Stingrays were “built without one of the rear parking brake cables fully seated and engaged. That means the parking brake will only operate on one of the rear brake drums, reducing its operational capability and potentially allowing the car to roll away if parked on a steep hill.” Only 100 of the 800 ‘Vettes were bought off the dealer lots, though.

Source: http://www.autonews.com/article/20140911/OEM11/140919954/gm-issues-2-recalls-stop-sale-orders-for-2015-corvettes
 

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The story says recalls are on 2800 cars. It's either a very large bad batch or that employee is very busy. Certainly it's a quicker fix if it's just a matter of training. Less so if it's a matter of tweaking production of a part, let alone modifying a design. Maybe "poor implementation" is the term I'm looking for.

I am not trying to be inflammatory, mind you. But I also can't possibly care less if it calls into question an assembly line employee, or an engineer, or the engineer's dog. It's not a personal attack and nobody is perfect.
 

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Sciros, I understand what you are saying.

I do care very much about what the source of the issue is. One of those people has much more responsibilities than the other, makes much more money, is in a position more difficult to recruit for and replace, and should get more visibility in the company. Also, to be totally frank, if it is a design flaw, this should have been caught by his peers during one of the internal peer design review meetings (goodness, I hope all GM engineering teams do that). So, on one hand, we have an assembly line employee making a mistake, or we call onto question many engineers (and/or the management structure above them). There is a huge difference in what this says about the company, and the direction it is headed.

It could have been one assembly line employee making a mistake and who touched all of those cars. The employees remain at the same place on the line doing the same job as each car passes by. They don't get assigned to just one car and do all of the work on that car. In this way, each assembly line worker only has to learn how to install just one piece of the car, and can develop muscle memory to get better and better and better at it doing it over and over and over, and getting faster as they go.

As far as I know, it is within the realm of possibility that one guy did that particular step on all the affected cars. Also, for the brakes, note it was only on one side: that also implies it was the guy and not the part (as there are probably two folks installing the cables, one guy on each side of the car responsible only for his side). Also, if it were a part or design problem, then it should show up on each side (unless the parts are mirror images, in which case it could be the part, but not the design, as the design would have been the same for both, and then just mirror it in CAD to create the other side).

I am not sure how many parts that GM would get in at one time from their supplier for these brake parts. But I tend to agree with you as far as the 800 faulty brakes are concerned: a bad batch of parts is less likely than the assembly line worker making a mistake. Also, if the parts were bad, why wouldn't the brakes be bad on both sides?

If I were to guess the root cause for the 800 brakes I would almost be willing to bet it was an assembly line employee at fault, and for the airbag I would guess it could be either a bad batch from the supplier, or another assembly line employee messing up (but I think the bad batch from the supplier is more likely in this second case for the airbags).
 

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I have gone back and edited my post above to break down my thoughts on the two different issues: airbags, and brakes.
 

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Hi. My car is built yesterday waiting for shipment! Does this mean it will be held back now??
I think it all depends on the nature of the issue. If it's an assembly line guy/gal just doing things wrong and that got discovered, then assuming that discovery was actually made a few days before we found out (just now) then you might be fine. If it's a supplier batch thing, then I don't know.

Mine's scheduled for next week as far as I know so I'm curious as well but I don't think there's any way to be sure unless we knew exactly the nature of the issue. I'm glad they discovered it now, though. Brakes and airbags are important components to have working properly :-D
 

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I want to say that we had a member here complain of a parking brake cable issue, but I thought it was on a 2014 car. I'll need to check that!
 
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