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I need to travel about 140 miles tomorrow and the forecast if for lots of rain. I have not had the C7 in much rain. I would enjoy some input from those of you who have driven in heavy rains.
 

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I drove in some pretty hard rain and winds when I brought RedHot back from NCM. I simply put it in Weather mode and found it handled superbly. The tires were great. You should have no issues.
 

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No problem. Just don't go hot rodding it. Been through plenty of the wet stuff here on the wet (I mean west) side.
 

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Ditto. Yesterday was my last day of 5 heading back from NCM and it rained as hard as I've ever seen from entering PA to Harrisburg. Excellent wipers, excellent handling. Had it in weather mode while it was wet. My first convertible that didn't drip water on my lap when it rained that hard! I used to keep a towel in my Triumph Spitfire so my dates wouldn't get too wet. From the rain of course.
 

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Ditto. Yesterday was my last day of 5 heading back from NCM and it rained as hard as I've ever seen from entering PA to Harrisburg. Excellent wipers, excellent handling. Had it in weather mode while it was wet. My first convertible that didn't drip water on my lap when it rained that hard! I used to keep a towel in my Triumph Spitfire so my dates wouldn't get too wet. From the rain of course.
Did your Spitfire have the floorboard mod for drainage? The "mod" was a hole with a plug so you could pull the plug and drain the water out. Many ragtops of that era had drain plugs for the interior..... Of course that assumes the floorboards hadn't created their own drainage as they rusted away. ;)
 

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I drove mine around for a week in the rain, it handled great, as long as you're comfortable driving sideways! Now I know why the Brit on the video said "Mucking about"
 

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gwm, It handles great in the weather mode. Driving down the road at 55 two lane and the water is puddled over the white line. Normally you hit that with your right front tire and your vehicle would hydroplane, no problem with the C7. My Vette is a daily driver, that's why GM installed wiper blades.

SF
Rick
 

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... that's why GM installed wiper blades.
SF
Rick
Wow Rick, I was wondering why they put those things on the windshield. We don't have a lot of use for them in the desert :D
 

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We finally got some rain in west Texas. :D I drove in it everyday in weather mode. This car handles wet weather very well... the car felt heavier in weather mode (like a tank)! ;)
 
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Drove through the hardest rain imaginable to see Ralphie May at The Improv. It was the type of rain that makes people pull over and stop. People were driving with their hazard lights flashing. Was prepared for the worst but my Stingray was amazing. I was absolutely impressed with its wet handling and Weather Mode is awesome. The various driving modes and transparent roof panel remain my favorite features of this car.


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With all the electronic assists, vettes do pretty well in the rain. It's all the other idiots out there, determined to rewrite the laws of physics, who scare the bejesus out of me.
 

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Speaking of the other idiots, why do people insist on putting their hazard lights on in heavy rain??? Pet peeve of mine, in a lot of traffic, all those flashing lights make it even HARDER to see stuff through the rain. If you think you are a hazard, GET OFF THE ROAD!!!
 

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LOL to the above two posts. I think what makes them the most funny is the accuracy behind them.
 

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Speaking of the other idiots, why do people insist on putting their hazard lights on in heavy rain??? Pet peeve of mine, in a lot of traffic, all those flashing lights make it even HARDER to see stuff through the rain. If you think you are a hazard, GET OFF THE ROAD!!!
I passed a pack of about 20 cars driving 45 mph IN THE LEFT LANE with their hazard lights flashing - in the pouring rain. That's when it occurred to me that some people should be stabbed in the throat with their own driver's license. Thankfully, that's when the HUD notified me an awesome song was playing on XM Channel 34, so I pressed SELECT on the steering wheel instead, smiled and just drove around them.

Did I mention the infotainment system is one of my favorite things about this car?


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Thankfully, that's when the HUD notified me an awesome song was playing on XM Channel 34, so I pressed SELECT on the steering wheel instead, smiled and just drove around them.

Did I mention the infotainment system is one of my favorite things about this car?


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Raydor how do you do that?
 

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Little known fact...the biggest factor in hydroplaning resistance is tire pressure. It has nothing to do with tread design or tread depth, despite what tire manufacturers try to sell you. The higher the pressure, the higher the speed you can achieve before your tires will lose contact through puddles.

Another thing that surprises many...the weight of your vehicle is practically irrelevant. Water doesn't care if you're a Spark or Silverado. Silverados run higher tire pressures, so they resist hydroplaning better than most cars. But remember, a 747 can hydroplane easily if its tire pressures are low (they run almost 200 PSI to avoid hydroplaning at 180 MPH).

The tire pressure formula used by pilots to avoid hydroplaning ignores weight, since it is such a minute consideration.

Now, traction on a wet surface (not accumulated water) depends on many factors, including tread design, tread depth, alignment specs, rubber composition and road surface condition. This is unrelated to hydroplaning.

So, if you're worried about hydroplaning, jack your tire pressure to max allowed by tire specs. Just remember, this procedure won't improve your cornering or braking ability if the road surface is simply wet - won't hurt, though. Then, remember to lower your pressures to the car manufacturer recommended spec when the rain ends to avoid uneven tire wear and a hard ride.



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By the way, electronic stability control can't rewrite physics either (even weather mode). If your tires lose contact with road, ESC becomes irrelevant.


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