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I may be among the few to actually try to heel toe on the downshifts, but does anyone else find it next to impossible to land a smooth heel toe to rev match the down shifts around corners? The position of the throttle to the brake pedal require your ankles to have the dexterity of an overcooked noodle.

For reference, I'm 24 years old and have plenty of good heel toe experience with other cars. But I can't do it for the life of me in this car. Any tips! Anyone else figure outa good way or have the same experience as me?
 

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I may be among the few to actually try to heel toe on the downshifts, but does anyone else find it next to impossible to land a smooth heel toe to rev match the down shifts around corners? The position of the throttle to the brake pedal require your ankles to have the dexterity of an overcooked noodle.

For reference, I'm 24 years old and have plenty of good heel toe experience with other cars. But I can't do it for the life of me in this car. Any tips! Anyone else figure outa good way or have the same experience as me?
It's difficult but certainly not impossible. Being 24 it's quite possible most of your previous cars had throttles that pivot from the top, making heal/toe a different movement than vehicles with a throttle that pivots from below. Using a traditional movement where your toe is on the brake and your heal is on the throttle places it very low to the pivot point when the throttle pivots on the floor. You have 2 choices, raise your entire foot higher (rather uncomfortable) or use a rolling action where you foot covers both pedals in a vertical orientation and you rotate your foot around the vertical axis rather than the horixontal or inclined axis. basically pressing on the top of the throttle pedal.

Taken to the extreme, I learned how to heal toe on a car with all 3 pedals pivoting on the floor (Porsche 911). Here's a great video on how that works and on the rotation I'm talking about.


Here's a long video with Hurley Haywood, Heal Toe is addressed about half way through. He teaches a different method but it's only meant to get one blip timed to the clutch release, not for fine RPM control.

 

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I plan to attend the three day Fellow's course in November. I'e no used heel/toe before but have been practicing and have found it possible to just roll my right mid-lateral foot to the accelerator to blip on downshifts. With a motorcycle it is much easier as it is a right hand blip on a downshift. Love the rev match though which seems very precise, though somewhat slower.
 

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I never did heel/toe for performance or clutch saving reasons, but did a lot of toe/heel for starting out going up mountains in manual trucks/cars. I am not sure if most people do heel/toe or toe/heel with which part of the foot on the brake and which part on the accelerator, but I always kept the area just in front of my heel up to almost the middle of my foot on the brake, and the toes I would use to operate the accelerator. That worked like a charm, and with that position gives you a lot of latitude on how to flex your foot (you can turn your foot out [duck foot] much easier than you can turn it in [pigeon toe]). The only thing is you have to have your heel hovering in the air at some point, and cannot rest your heel on the floor at any point while doing this.
 

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I've never tried it in a C7. My C7 is missing the pedal on the left, Oh that's right it's an automatic!

I will have to drive a manual C7, I've got a lot of time heel toeing C5's and C6's.

I actually still double clutch but can do it as fast as most people not double clutching. I can't do it without double clutching old habits for 50 years are hard to break. LOL

I was impressed with the automatic blipping the throttle when down shifting with the automatic transmission, I think the back story on the automatic blip on downshifts is it's easier on the driveline so less warranty claims!
 

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I may be among the few to actually try to heel toe on the downshifts, but does anyone else find it next to impossible to land a smooth heel toe to rev match the down shifts around corners? The position of the throttle to the brake pedal require your ankles to have the dexterity of an overcooked noodle.

For reference, I'm 24 years old and have plenty of good heel toe experience with other cars. But I can't do it for the life of me in this car. Any tips! Anyone else figure outa good way or have the same experience as me?
What exactly is the problem? You can't get your feet to the right positions or you can't hit the correct revs?

If the former, you might want to try toe on the brake and heel on the gas. That's the way I've done it forever and now I'm rather stuck with the habit, but it seems to work just fine in the C7.

If the latter, I feel like the throttle response changes between modes, so try to make sure you practice using the same mode. Also, don't be afraid to turn on the rev match and then heel and toe anyway. If you miss low (which I find is by far my most common direction of miss, probably because I'm used to the free revving engine in my S2000), the Automatic Rev Match system will add the extra revs you are missing.
 

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I may be among the few to actually try to heel toe on the downshifts, but does anyone else find it next to impossible to land a smooth heel toe to rev match the down shifts around corners? The position of the throttle to the brake pedal require your ankles to have the dexterity of an overcooked noodle.

For reference, I'm 24 years old and have plenty of good heel toe experience with other cars. But I can't do it for the life of me in this car. Any tips! Anyone else figure outa good way or have the same experience as me?
Used heel-toe to downshift all the time in my C6. However with my C7, why bother-I use rev matching. Around town and in the country where I live it does a better job consistently at part throttle downshifts. Every DD I have owned since the late '50's has had a standard transmission. Many were not laid out to make it convenient. At times had to use different foot positions. Guess at ’71 I think the C6 and C7 are not bad. That video with Hurley Haywood is great. He’s 66! Guess it just takes time (kidding!)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I can rev match perfectly if I could just get the right foot position. The way I've always done it is toes on the brake and heel on the gas. I love how it feels - so satisfying. But with the c7 I can't do that; the throttle mounted from the floor doesn't allow that position.

I watched the video and I can do it that way, it's just that it's cutting it a little close (can only get about 1/2" coverage on either pedal at the same time; I don't want to slip off either pedal). It also doesn't feel as gratifying to me that way. I guess I'll just have to live with the more vertical foot position when I do it.

Sometimes I put the auto rev match on, but it's just so much faster to do it myself. And I've definitely had it on and I've then heel-toed it myself and the system works fine with it.

Thanks for all the replies!
 

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With the C5, C6 and C7 the technique is not literal "Heel Toe".

You must put the left ball of foot on brake and right side over the gas pedal, the required technique is to roll the ball of the foot to the right to blip the throttle.

We call it "Heel Toe" but it's "Roll the foot to the side".

Now my 62 Corvette required the literal "Heel Toe"!
 
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