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The ‘backstory’:

I have a smaller garage where RedHot is stored and a larger one. Both garages are now ten years old (we built our house in 2005) and had their floors professionally epoxy coated when new. The epoxy looked great and held up pretty well for about 8 years and then started having a few areas where it lifted slightly from either hot tires (we live in the desert) or had some battery acid leak from a prior golf cart. I considered getting them redone with epoxy but ultimately decided against it for 2 reasons: it would have to be done again in about 9 to 10 years, and the cars would have to be outside for a week to allow proper and full curing.

Options:

I considered flooring alternatives and narrowed it down to RaceDeck (from Snap Lock) and TechFloor (from WeatherTech), both incidentally manufactured in the USA. [Included in my review were also tiles by Swisstrax, Costco, etc. eliminated as not matching my needs as well as either RaceDeck and TechFloor did.] In case you are not familiar with either, they are both interlocking tiles systems that end up creating a ‘floating’ floor above your existing garage floor. The underside of the tiles are designed to allow liquids to flow out and away as well as to allow for air to pass to avoid any mold growing. The only prep you need to do before putting them down is to sweep clean any dirt, etc. I got samples of both and then decided I preferred the thicker tile of RaceDeck. The tiles are impervious to most chemicals and petroleum products. Basically the only thing I saw from reading lots of reviews was you shouldn’t do any arc welding on them unless you protect the tiles. Since I wasn’t planning on taking up arc welding that was not an issue. And, if I do and somehow destroy an individual tile, you can take it out and replace it. They are rated for vehicle rolling loads to about 80,000 pounds, so apparently next time Jay Leno comes over, if he wants to park his modified M47 Patton M1 tank (or even if he gets that Abrams tank he was looking at) in my larger garage, it should be OK. I used the RaceDeck’s excellent garage-floor-designer/planner on their web site to figure out: the colors (it comes in 12 or so); my design; type of tile (they have several, I went with a combination of “diamond and free-flow;” diamond are solid on top while free-flow are a grid with openings all the way through); and the number of tiles needed for each garage. I also ordered their AccuPark system (2 per car) which enables you to pull in and park in the exact location each time. They are metal and interlock right into the floor just like the standard RaceDeck tiles, include a ‘warning’ raised bump you drive over and then the second bump you stop at. I also ordered the tapered leading edge tiles in the matching colors for use at the respective garage doors.

Process:

I purchased everything directly from Snap Lock and they shipped it to my house, arriving on a single pallet weighing 699 pounds. The tiles were packaged into 20 boxes, with the average being about 35 pounds. The solid tiles are heavier than the Free-Flow. I broke the pallet down into two piles representing the tiles etc. that were to go into each garage.
Here is a picture of the pallet.

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Here are the garages pre-RaceDeck installation.

P1050218.jpg P1050244.jpg

The tiles I went with are their standard 12”x12” (they also sell the same system in 18”x18”), so unless your garage is close to some multiple of 12” you will probably end up doing some cutting to fit your specific install. While you can cut them with a variety of tools, I decided to get a couple to make the job easier (IMO the ‘right’ tool always reduces stress and makes the job go easier, and you can’t have too many tools). I purchased a Rockwell BladeRunnerX2 (kind of like an upside down table-mounted jig saw with great cutting guides), Bosch plastic cutting blades for it, and a Keter Work Bench so that I can cut/trim the tiles as needed ‘on location’ in each garage.
The process is really very straight forward, following their printed instructions on every box of tiles and their video (on their web site). It took me about 2 ½ hours start to finish to do the smaller (Corvette) garage including the cutting of the tiles to finish the floor to rear wall area (it was about 3 additional inches that I needed to cut for the area across the back wall). After installing the AccuPark the instructions recommend allowing the tape that adheres the metal plate to the special flat interlocking tiles to ‘cure’ up a couple of hours before parking on it. I followed those instructions but that ‘wait’ time is not included in my start to finish time. Gel knee pads were an absolute must since you are continually going down on your knee as you install the next tile in a row (however alternatively, you can, as demonstrated in their video, step on each tile as you put them down instead of getting down on a knee and using a rubber mallet as I did). The BladeRunnerX2 made cutting the tiles for the areas that were less than 12” long a piece of cake. The guide ensured the cuts were straight.

There were no surprises other than how easy it really was to do by yourself. The finished floor looked so good I was really reluctant to put my miscellaneous junk back in the garages.

Here are progressive pictures of the process in my smaller garage.

P1050226.jpg P1050227.jpg P1050228.jpg P1050229.jpg P1050230.jpg P1050231.jpg P1050232.jpg P1050233.jpg P1050241.jpg

Here are a few from the larger garage which took me about 6 or so hours. It took longer both because of its size and the number of built-ins I had to custom cut around. Also because that garage faces the street a number of neighbors stopped by to look, ask questions, etc. which added time. By the way, for doing the cutouts around circular objects I used cardboard to make the template and then transferred it to the tile to cut.


Here are progressive pictures of the process in my larger garage.

P1050245.jpg P1050246.jpg P1050247.jpg P1050248.jpg P1050249.jpg P1050250.jpg P1050251.jpg P1050253.jpg P1050254.jpg

Bottom line, would I do this again now having done it? Absolutely! Remember to check back re long term durability when RedHot becomes an antique or is replaced by a C9 RedHot.:cool:
 

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Nice job. My race deck is all pulled up and stacked right now. I should be installing it at what will be the third location since I got it I've managed to kill a few tiles along the way with welding being the main culprit... 12 years and still hanging in there.
Main problem now is that I'll be itching to buy some blue tiles to go with the charcoal and silver I already have.
 
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Thanks. Yup, that's why I am not going to start welding :D in my garages (as well as I don't have the equipment...). The Royal Blue does really look nice.
 

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Thanks. Yup, that's why I am not going to start welding :D in my garages (as well as I don't have the equipment...). The Royal Blue does really look nice.
When it's 40 deg outside with rain/mist, welding outdoors is not so much of an option. That issue is about 30 days from being cured though.. Of course going from a 3 car back to a 2 car space will leave me plenty of spare tiles.

BTW, nice job leaving the 1/2" gaps all the way around, you'll need it as the tiles expand and contract.
 

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Sharp eye. I forgot to mention the need to have a gap in the write-up.
 

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It looks wonderful. Jeff. Thanks for the write up and pictures. I am having a new home built starting in June. There will be a two car garage, and a one car garage that is offset from the two car garage forming an "L". The one car garage is where the Corvette will live and I plan to put Race Deck in that garage. I will probably go with Graphite and Red tiles since the car is SGM with AR interior. It will be a year round room with AC/heating. Thanks for the guidance and ideas.
 
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Sharp eye. I forgot to mention the need to have a gap in the write-up.
More like been there done that and making sure you did as well...
 

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Very Impressive.
 

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Great job Jeff!! I didn't know about the parking aids when I did mine. How hard do you think they are to put in once the floor is down?
 

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As I've been thinking about finishing the floors in my garages (3-car attached, & 2-car detached toy space) I've considered RaceDeck. Once question for you. Aren't you concerned that the stuff that gets down underneath it will accumulate and build up, requiring a removal and cleaning over time? Lot's of melting snow and salt residue here in NWI in the winter months. I realize that you don't get snow in NV, but I'm sure there are other things that will get under it in a similar fashion.
 

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Thank you all, it exceeded my expectations. :cool:
 

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Great job Jeff!! I didn't know about the parking aids when I did mine. How hard do you think they are to put in once the floor is down?
They show how to remove individual tiles by pushing in the male hooks so it should not be too big of an issue. You would be taking out 2 tiles for each AccuPark you put in.
 

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As I've been thinking about finishing the floors in my garages (3-car attached, & 2-car detached toy space) I've considered RaceDeck. Once question for you. Aren't you concerned that the stuff that gets down underneath it will accumulate and build up, requiring a removal and cleaning over time? Lot's of melting snow and salt residue here in NWI in the winter months. I realize that you don't get snow in NV, but I'm sure there are other things that will get under it in a similar fashion.
I don't think build up should be an issue. All of the tiles, solid and open, have large drainage channels on the underside so you could just use a hose and wash out any junk that is beneath them. Also you can use a shop vacuum to easily suck up stuff that drops through the open tiles.
 

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Looks great Jeff. I too was amazed how easy it goes down and the transformation in looks
 

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Jeff, Very nice design pattern. Colorful and interesting but not too wild. I continued up some walls and stairs with my garage flooring. It has been 10 years and it looks brand new.
 

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I don't think build up should be an issue. All of the tiles, solid and open, have large drainage channels on the underside so you could just use a hose and wash out any junk that is beneath them. Also you can use a shop vacuum to easily suck up stuff that drops through the open tiles.
Will the water drain out the bottom with the edging on at the door?
 

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Will the water drain out the bottom with the edging on at the door?
Yes. The edging allows it to pass. It has no rubber or seal to restrict.
 
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Great job and write-up!

How do the tiles sound when you walk on them? Is it at all hollow or plastic sounding?

About 15 years ago, I installed a floating, interlocking plank floor inside the house. It sounded cheap, so it got torn up after a year.
 
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