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Funny thing. My fob wasn’t working started car with phone. Drove it parked for 2 hours. Had to use my phone again
Interesting, because your fob was working well enough to get into the car and drive off. Unless you opened the car via app or key and used the fob in the steering wheel slot.

Still sounds like you should replace the fob battery.
 

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Battery in my primary fob died yesterday. No warning. Car was delivered in late June 2015 so it lasted 3 years and 3 months. Separating the 2 halves of the case was a little more difficult than I expected as I was concerned I was going to break it but it did finally separate without any breakage. I guess I should go ahead and put a new battery in the other fob that has rarely been used.
 
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Just a tip: When replacing the battery - per the instructions in manual - be careful not to lose the little tab that is used to release the removable metal key. It can be very difficult to find. Voice of experience.

Also, I now carry spare batteries in the car.
Got this from another contributor on this site and thought it was a pretty good idea. Place the FOB in a plastic bag while working on it so any parts trying to escape are confined to a easier search area....
 

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This thread coincided with my fob starting to not be recognized by the car. I didn't think too much of it at first and it would be fine for a short while after a drive with the fob inserted in the steering column but then I saw this thread and said to myself... Self, maybe you should replace the fob battery. Real problem avoided. Thanks SRF friends! :victorious:
 

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I guess the average shelf life of a FOB battery is 3 to 4 years, I've replaced both of our once since 2014.

SF
Rick
 

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My service advisor told me that if you store your fobs close to the car this will drain the fob battery as the fob and car continue to communicate. Anyone else hear this?
 

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Had to replace the battery in my wife's FOB about a half hour ago. She keeps hers in faraday bag and hardly ever uses it. We bought the car on Dec1 of 2015. Mine is still going strong. You would think that the fact it was hardly used that it would have outlasted mine. Better knock on wood. Mine is probably shortly to follow.
 

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I'm starting to feel a bit odd reading some of these POSTS. Yes i am a bit OCD so let's get that out in the open but I sit down every December with a shiny new multi pac of 2032 batteries and spend less than an half hour changing all the key FOB batteries including spares ( that may have never been used in the prior year.) As a matter of fact i just changed the batteries for my 6 month old Jeep JL since I had 2 extra batteries in a package I didn't want to store.
And I get that some folks just can't bring themselves to my level of crazy , including my sons who think I am crazy when I offer to change theirs as well. "What are you doing changing batteries that are still working fine?" is I believe their mantra. Just seems like cheap insurance to prevent the hassle of some sort of key FOB related failure. Guess it's a generational thing....:nightmare:
 

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My service advisor told me that if you store your fobs close to the car this will drain the fob battery as the fob and car continue to communicate. Anyone else hear this?
Seems reasonable. and I wonder "how close is close"? I would think that they need to be within just a few feet of each other for the passive communication to work.

From the web:

Slight parasitic draws can pose a problem. While the vehicle’s system will (or should) go to sleep after a specified time (after the vehicle has been shut off, parked and exited), the proximity of the smart key to the vehicle can result in the possibility of a dead battery if the smart key remains in close proximity to the vehicle.

For instance, if the vehicle is parked close to a house, where the driver’s smart key or proximity card is stored within the design range of the system (for instance, with the smart key in a purse or wallet that’s within the key’s transponder range). If the system is constantly kept “awake,” this parasitic draw can, depending on the circumstances, result in a dead vehicle battery.

If a customer has a recurring issue of a drained battery, make it a point to ask about where the smart key is stored overnight in relation to the parked vehicle. Parasitic draws also can affect the battery in the remote key fob. If routinely stored within the reception range of the vehicle, the fob battery may prematurely die.


Today’s key fobs/smart keys provide convenience -- and cause problems
 

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My service advisor told me that if you store your fobs close to the car this will drain the fob battery as the fob and car continue to communicate. Anyone else hear this?
Your service advisor is full of it.


The car and fob never "communicate" except in very defined circumstances; if a button on the fob is pressed, or if a button on the car is pressed. The fob spends a very small amount of energy "listening." The (main) reason that many people report that both fob batteries go bad at the same time is that, probably because most fob use is passive, meaning rarely does a button of the fob get pressed.

The last Corvette that had an active fob-car communication was the C5. It only lasted a few years, because it not only drained the fob battery, it drained the car battery, and drove owners batty with all the locking and unlocking whenever the car and fob were near.
 

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Just a tip: When replacing the battery - per the instructions in manual - be careful not to lose the little tab that is used to release the removable metal key. It can be very difficult to find. Voice of experience.

Also, I now carry spare batteries in the car.
Good advice.

I just changed both of mine last night. First one went perfectly, second not so. While I didn't lose the piece, it just wouldn't not fix properly. Case closed fine but it doesn't hold the key tightly. Since this is the spare one, a little bit of clear packing tape does just fine.
 

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Keep a battery in the car!!!!
No need.

The fob will work just fine in the fob slot. It will even work if no battery is installed. No reason to risk losing parts by changing the battery in your lap in the car (ask me how I know).

Virtually any large store has fresher batteries than you would by "keeping a spare."

Walmart is where I store my batteries.
 

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I'm starting to feel a bit odd reading some of these POSTS. Yes i am a bit OCD so let's get that out in the open but I sit down every December with a shiny new multi pac of 2032 batteries and spend less than an half hour changing all the key FOB batteries including spares ( that may have never been used in the prior year.) As a matter of fact i just changed the batteries for my 6 month old Jeep JL since I had 2 extra batteries in a package I didn't want to store.
And I get that some folks just can't bring themselves to my level of crazy , including my sons who think I am crazy when I offer to change theirs as well. "What are you doing changing batteries that are still working fine?" is I believe their mantra. Just seems like cheap insurance to prevent the hassle of some sort of key FOB related failure. Guess it's a generational thing....:nightmare:
I haven't done this with car key fob batteries but it is probably a good idea. Same goes for changing batteries in smoke detectors and for me, my house thermostat. It has a couple of AAA batteries and the usual way I have found out that they are shot is when I wake up on a cold winter morning and the temp in the house is around 60 degrees. Changing them regularly now. --Bob
 

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I haven't done this with car key fob batteries but it is probably a good idea. Same goes for changing batteries in smoke detectors and for me, my house thermostat. It has a couple of AAA batteries and the usual way I have found out that they are shot is when I wake up on a cold winter morning and the temp in the house is around 60 degrees. Changing them regularly now. --Bob
LOL. As anal as I am about the car and associated items I completely drop the ball on the smoke and house hold battery using products. Like you it always seems to be in the middle of the night when it goes off and i am forced to get the ladder out of the garage and rip the unit off the ceiling and take it apart to make it stop...
 
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If you hide the fob somewhere outside on the car doesn't it have to be in a metal container?
No need to keep a fob (with electronics) outside the car, just a copy of a key (strapped/taped somewhere). Then you can keep a fob inside the car with a battery wrapped in foil (it doesn't take too much effort to find a place that the car will not recognize it), or take out the battery. Then either unwrap the fob or stick it in the slot after you use the key to get in.

Personally, I don't keep a key outside at all, but it's not a bad idea. When driving locally I use only one fob, and if I lose it, I can have someone bring me one from home, just like I would do for them. When on the road, both fobs come with. If it's both of us, each keeps track of one, and if it's just me (most likely option), I keep them in separate locations, usually one in my purse, and one on my person.
 

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If you hide the fob somewhere outside on the car doesn't it have to be in a metal container?
Remember you can unlock the car with your phone app as well. I personally never have a key and/or FOB hidden on any of my cars (or for that matter, a key under the mat at my home ;) ;) )
 
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