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Background: I have a Stingray on order for MSRP from a local dealer. They were very honest in telling me they could not say when my car would be produced, but they would honor MSRP when it arrived. I put down a deposit and and was advanced to code 2051 three days later. All is well with that shop.

I noted that another dealer in the area received a car with all the options I wanted plus a few more (3LT vs 1LT). My neighbor went to look at the car yesterday and said they had a $10K markup. Their website listed it at MSRP as the Internet price. Out of curiosity, I emailed the dealer to ask if they were honoring their internet price. I might cancel my order and buy the more expensive car if it were available right now. They replied, no, there would be a $10K markup. Not interested.

I am curious on what California and Federal law state about honoring a price listed/advertised on the internet. I really don't want to hold their feet to the fire, as I keep my vettes for years, and need a reliable location for service.

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More then likely there is a disclaimer on the site in case of any pricing mistakes/issues.

We have one on our site "I work at a dealership".
 

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Background: I have a Stingray on order for MSRP from a local dealer. They were very honest in telling me they could not say when my car would be produced, but they would honor MSRP when it arrived. I put down a deposit and and was advanced to code 2051 three days later. All is well with that shop.

I noted that another dealer in the area received a car with all the options I wanted plus a few more (3LT vs 1LT). My neighbor went to look at the car yesterday and said they had a $10K markup. Their website listed it at MSRP as the Internet price. Out of curiosity, I emailed the dealer to ask if they were honoring their internet price. I might cancel my order and buy the more expensive car if it were available right now. They replied, no, there would be a $10K markup. Not interested.

I am curious on what California and Federal law state about honoring a price listed/advertised on the internet. I really don't want to hold their feet to the fire, as I keep my vettes for years, and need a reliable location for service.

Comments?
I sold too, and I agree with JM. That said, if the dealer is not too far from you, go in with checkbook in hand. If they say "no" again, fold your hand and go home. You haven't lost a thing. Dealers are forever getting phone calls about price. Dealers strongly resist giving away anything during a cold phone call. If you want the 'best price', you've got to be present to win!

When/If you do pay them a visit, go in as if your neighbor hadn't called. Tell them you saw the ad for an in-stock C7. Tell your rep that you've done some research about the car (not price) but you'd like him/her to show you the car. Don't mention price until you are well into the process. Invest a bit of your time, demonstrating sincere interest. The rep will need that when requests MSRP. If he asks if you're prepared to take it home today, say YES, and mean it. I just checked autotrader.com and did a search for C7s within 75 mi of 90210 (the only CA zip I know. LOL). There were 11 vehicles available!!! I don't know how far Long Beach is from LA but who cares. You've got some negotiating power! GO FOR IT!
 
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California's version of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) and the common law of contracts apply here. The law is simply this - an advertisement is (generally) NOT an offer. A legally binding offer is the "manifestation of willingness to enter into an agreement, demonstrated by a promise, undertaking, or commitment, and communicated to a specific offeree." Since most people (should) know that the advertisement is being made to many people, not just them, it lacks the specificity required to legally bind the dealer. Furthermore, if you have information or reasonably suspect that the price advertised is inaccurate, you can't play the "willful ignorance" card.

In sum, the law won't help you here. Screw the $10K markup, wait 3 months, and get one below MSRP.
 

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More then likely there is a disclaimer on the site in case of any pricing mistakes/issues.

We have one on our site "I work at a dealership".
^^^ this is EXACTLY right. Everyone has the CYA lawyer BS in teeny tiny fine print somewhere on their website. Most of the time the mistakes are honest mistakes BUT there are a few dealers out there that abuse the loophole. The reason it's fairly easy to find incorrect pricing on things such as the C7 is that their internet websites are fed from their inventory tracking system, most of these websites do not have the ability to distinguish certain models for different pricing rules OR the ability to detect dealer add ons (market adjustments, aftermarket equipment, mop & glow BS, etc). We typically have to go in after the site updates and manually change special vehicles and their pricing. We specialize in commercial equipment such as service bodies, box vans, etc & are constantly chasing our tails because of commercial upfits missing from pricing. It's kind of funny too because customers are literally waiting to pounce on a freshly uploaded vehicle with incomplete pricing information with their accusations of dishonesty, LOL. I say go with your gut, most of the folks are making an effort to keep those things updated but with hundreds/ thousands of vehicles to keep track of it just takes time.
 
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