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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so I've read all of the information on the proper break-in procedures. My question to those more knowledgable than myself, is when it says not to drive for extended periods at the same speed (ie using the cruise control) and to vary the speed -- what is a good variance speed range? Down here in Florida if I go 10 mph below the speed limit I'll get run over and if I go 10+ above I'll no doubt get pulled over.

Any help is appreciated.
 

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just did 1200 miles this way....if you are on interstate to get home, this works great....

what transmission?

speed is really not what needs to be varied, it's the rpm, so either on the manual trans or AT, - shift back and forth between 7, 6 and 5th, or with the AT, shift to M and use the paddles to do the same...10 min in each gear or so....


tip: Please set up your signature under settings to show model and options then we will not have to ask....
 

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You know for me "break in" is not so much a vehicle speed issue, as it is a rpm issue. When I say RPM I mean for the whole drive line. I find it a whole lot easier to vary drive line speed with a manual tranny, but it just takes a bit more effort to do it with a automatic. I just use different roads for different functions and try to blend the two. I make a concerted effort to take a drive using different drive line speeds at differing time intervals. To be honest though, there is so much personal opinion involved in this sort of answer that you will no doubt hear different approaches. The one thing that I find to be the most important thing is a sooner than recommended "first" oil change. It's cheap engine insurance! I know others that will go as far as replace all major fluids, but not only is this expensive, I don't believe that it is necessary. I guess the long & short answer to your question lies somewhere between "Drive it like you stole it" & "Just baby it". I suspect you have an idea already as to what will work for you. Just do what you think is best and enjoy the process.
 

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Ditto Chip's and glen e's comments that it is all about RPM variance, and here's why that is important.

One importance of proper break-in is getting the piston rings to properly settle in, and getting oil to them is the key. This is done through the cyclinder vacuum that instantaneously occurs when you take your foot off the throttle, i.e., the vacuum literally sucks in additional oil into the cylinders.

I wonder if GM may be using the new-to-the-LT1 "piston squirters" to add additional oil, not just when the engine is cold, nor when the engine is under extreme load, but if they also programmed the squirters to add more oil all the time during the 500 mile break-in period? Even if true, I still belong to the "follow GM break-in procedures" camp, for there are many more parts that also need to be properly broken in, i.e., when I talked to previous Chief Engineer Dave Hill, he stressed to me that he wanted break-in to occur as spec'd for the differential to properly wear itself in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great insight all -- thank you. I'll just have to make a point to vary the RPMs on the drive: throttle up and throttle down -- from Jax to Naples and back -- it's highway all the way so that's probably the best solution. When my C6 was new (under 100 miles) I took it on a long business trip with 99% highway driving and used the cruise control all the way. It had just over 40K on it when I traded for the C7 and it never gave me a lick of problem. So I guess it'll all work out fine. And if it doesn't, well, that's what warranties are for...

But speaking of the paddle shifters, I'm embarrassed to say that for the six-plus years I had the C6 I never did use them. Never. Honestly, I'm not sure how to. I haven't driven a manual for ages -- last was the 1973 Corvette I used to drive -- back in 1973 -- Yikes. I'll have to experiment with them sometime. But if you all have any tips on that, please pass them along.

BTW, she's a LMG LT2 with Kalahari interior, chrome wheels and just beautiful.
 

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...But speaking of the paddle shifters, I'm embarrassed to say that for the six-plus years I had the C6 I never did use them. Never. Honestly, I'm not sure how to. I haven't driven a manual for ages -- last was the 1973 Corvette I used to drive -- back in 1973 -- Yikes. I'll have to experiment with them sometime.
I would be very much interested in hearing about your learning process with your paddle shifted tranny. If you have the time and the inclination, please start a new thread about your thoughts / learning experience with the paddle shifted tranny.
 

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Great insights - thanks for all the comments. This is something I didnt know about - varying RPM. Love these forums as I get to learn things I didnt know before :)
 

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Done right it takes about 50 miles to run in the systems on the car. If you can run the first 50 / 100 miles on back roads working the throttle and brakes then just fill her up, hop on the interstate and make a beeline for home.
 

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Unless the material of engin blocks have changed, no longer being metal, the process of the breakin is to work harden the cylinder wall and not create a ridge which your piston rings will travel over when you run your engin hard. That is why all the people who said to vary the rpm's are correct. To get the maximum travel of the pistons you will need to accelerate hard but not long to work in the upper most part of the cylinder wall. The only engin everbuilt that did not require this is the rotary. For a piston engine commuting to the city on a country road is the best to break it in.
 
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