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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As asked, here is a separate thread on lowering your StingRay:

Thanks to travisnd, here is your answer !10fwy: The process is simple and similar to what one does on both the C5's/C6's.

"In the front you turn the bolt counter-clockwise to move the adjuster closer to the spring. This closes the gap between the lower control-arm and spring thereby lowering the car. In the rear the spring hangs below the a-arm. You back off the nut to where only a couple of threads show on the bolt this widens the distance between the spring and lower control-arm thus pushing the suspension higher up in the car and allowing the car to sit lower. To go farther than OEM adjustments you can cut the spring adjuster pad in the front and out back you can get longer bolts. However, going farther than OEM will negatively alter suspension geometry and the shocks will be bottoming out. For best performance lower the car 1/2-3/4" from OEM height and leave it there. Those that go more are just looking for a "slammed" look and are actually hurting the handling capabilities of the car. Lowering the car changes camber and toe so you'll want to get it realigned."

For lowering bolt pictures, and other suspension pictures and info:
http://www.edmunds.com/car-reviews/t...alkaround.html

A little more about lowering, as in the following pictures of someone who has just done that. Personally, would wait a month, as new Corvettes settle on their composite springs. We have seen StingRays which almost look "jacked up," while other look like they have settled nicely. Probably, that is due to the amount of time since they left the production line, the amount of miles they have been driven since, etc. In the pictures below, they lowered the front .75" (as much as they could on stock bolts), the rear .25". Would suggest that each car be measured and its lowering be separately determined, not mimicking what was done for this white car. Also would strongly recommend an alignment afterwards.

Of course, some folks have dips and bumps in their driveways, on the way to work etc. Have a Z06 with its standard 3.2" of ground clearance and while I take all of those things, SLOWLY, at a 45 degree angle, have not had a problem. We are still waiting for the exact ground clearance of a StingRay, but it will be more than 3.2".





 

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Great post guys
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Need to add, that before using your adjustment wrench, insure you have taken the weight off that area, by using a jack to raise one end of the composite spring, then use your wrench -- these measures to avoid stripping the threads on the bolt. Here's a picture of one adjusting bolt (green arrow pointing toward it).

 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Is the MRC system lowered the same way?
yes..the mrc is unaffected..

and if you read the posts on this, eveyone is asking questions like - what about the handling?, won't this hurt the suspension?, etc...

Guys, this is a stock modification. Chev made the car with these bolts for doing this.We are not adding anything here..GM wanted this on their car so you could raise it up down for racing doing something called "corner balancing".It is not there so you can "lower " the car for looks - you only can drop it 1" and people who drop usually want more than that...it is there for racing, but the side benefit is all of us that want a bit better look, get it. You can still get over speed bumps, etc..it is not a radical boy racer change...the other beneift is raise it in winter for snow, lower for summer.

don't ovethink this...but damn, the look is nicer - here a stock car that has been lowered the 1":
 

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Great post and I would like to lower the car just a bit to kill the offroad look but still keep the car easy to drive daily. I had a. '01 Roush that was low and the car was a PITA to drive and I'm not doing that to this car.

However, after seeing the C7 in person last weekend it is WAY too high and looks odd.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just saw another internet posting in which a bluedevil1 stated: "Just got my Laguna Blue back from the shop. They lowered her as low as possible on the stock bolts. Dropped almost 1" in the front and 3/4" in the rear. Checked the 4 wheel alignment and was still spot on. Definitely looks much better to me."

As we have discussed Corvettes naturally drop as they get a few miles (composite springs, etc). Personally, would be thinking about waiting until you get miles and your car and letting it "age" a month before I would go this far. However, perhaps bluedevil1's car already has time and miles on it and I am too cautious?
 

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I have a few questions; How or what do you use a reference as the indicator as how much the car is lowered? What baseline is the operation based on? How do you know that the car is exactly level when you get it, and before you start to change settings? If you use rotation count of the nut / bolt, is that as close as you can get it. Maybe checking the fender gap when its off the jacks? Details?
 

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You are only lowering a very small amount so you can count threads or measure from ground to fender, wheel to fender , any way you want to get a read before and after.
 

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Hey everyone. As a shop owner, C7 owner, and most importantly ENTHUSIAST, I wanted to chime in here.

Lowering the C7 is very simple, and requires hand tools as well as some WD-40 and some patience. As far as the science behind it, well, there really isn't any. Lowering your vehicle on it's stock leaf bolts will not affect the suspension geometry enough to cause any worry. We in the "business" have been lowering Vettes this way for years and years without any harm to the vehicle. There are aftermarket lowering bolts that are also available which WILL affect the alignment of the suspension. However, these are meant to lower a Corvette more than 2" in some cases.

Ensuring that your vehicle is level is pretty simple. First, make sure you are on level ground. We normally count the number of threads before and after turning the bolts ensuring that the same has been done from one side the other.

You then can easily measure the distance from level ground to the fender. If you're the same from side to side, then you're set.

Too many people out there are putting doubt is other's heads.

If you want to lower the stance of your C7, DO IT! Do not be afraid.

[email protected]
 

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Thanks erik - mine is doing fine from where you lowered it.

As Erik said, this is the first thing I would do with a new car as there is no downside:
1. looks much better
2. does not affect warranty
3. cheap - erik charges $75 or DIY - free!
4 does nor affect susp -no parts added-no align needed
5. body still clears parking curbs, and speed bumps
 

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Has anyone taken the time to actually corner weight the C7? I'm curious how the car is balanced side to side, not just front to rear.
 

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lowered1.jpg lowered2.jpg

I just had mine lowered at Levin Motorsports in St Pete, FL for $50. I didn't want to mess with it. With bigger wheels, it'll fill up what's left of the gap, but it looks much better than before.
 

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Have some noobish questions regarding lowering...

Am i getting the process about right? 1, jack up the vehicle so wheel is off the ground. 2, Take wheel off. 3, Jack up the composite spring to take weight off the adjuster. 4, turn the adjuster at the end of the bolt with a 10mm wrench.

Finally, can someone tell me what exactly is the composite spring that you need to raise? The black arm that the adjuster is attached to? Or the silver triangle thing in this photo?

Thanks!
 

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it's much easier than you are thinking.......you jack your car up using the puck spot (where you are supposed to jack) take off wheel and the just turn the bolt the green arrow is pointing to counter clockwise...end of mod...don't worry about the spring, taking stress off it, etc....
 

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Just lowered mine..took it down as far as bolts would allow..looks perfect, just enough clearance where I'm not scraping bottom on everything..have about 600 miles on it since I did it and don't sense any change in ride if you are considering it just do it...local race shop did it and aligned for $100 bucks..going straight for nitrous next!
 

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Also, doing it within the first few months or so allows you to freely turn the stud. If the job isn't done before the stud freezes (steel on steel) to the insert it mates with in the composite spring, you'll have a devil of a time getting it to turn, even when unloaded and doused with lubricants. Especially in Florida you folks near the salt water can expect the rust formation very early.

Here are some pics I took years ago on a spring that was in service 5 years before performing the lowering. That wimpy 10mm wrench is no match for a frozen joint. Notice the wrench I had to use to break it loose. And, I hate to even mention this, but just once I will say it..lol. Technically, the threaded part is a 'stud', not a bolt. The spring height adjuster looks like a bolt, but it is there only for the rotational ramping nature of the threads that give it the up/down feature that is needed in this application, as opposed to clamping two things together.







 
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