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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The news has been so bleak for so many auto museums that Kurt Ernst, editor of the classic-car news site Hemmings Daily included in his five predictions for 2018: “Expect to see more museums close and more collections head to auction.” He added this warning: “If you have a favorite museum, 2018 will be a good year to pay it a visit, or better yet, make a cash donation.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/10/business/car-museums-closing.html?rref=collection/sectioncollection/business&action=click&contentCollection=business&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=10&pgtype=sectionfront

“Perhaps there’s a limit to how many auto museums there can be,” said Matt Anderson, a curator at the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation in Dearborn, Mich., and the president of the National Association of Automobile Museums. His members worry about declining attendance. “They’re struggling with this realization that younger folks aren’t into cars the way their parents and grandparents were.”
 

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Thank you regguy1 for finding that news. Extremely nice that NCM is going in the opposite direction, with its just announced expansion plans!
 

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There's not as many Car Guys like there used to be ,on the up side if some of these cars go to auction it will give somebody a chance to own their dream car .
 

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^^^^^Supply and Demand. If demand dries up....well the price will drop.
 

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Back in 1973, I took the summer off and toured the country on a 750 Honda. One of the most memorable stops was the Harrah collection in Reno, Nevada. He seemed to have one of everything, going way, way back to the earliest days of the auto industry. Even had two Bugatti Royales. After he died, the collection was broken up and sold. I doubt there will ever be anything like it again.
 

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I think the unspoken question is what will happen to the value of old classic cars in the years to come if young people are no longer interested in owning them.
An acquaintance of mine made a living buying and selling cars. He started out with nothing, but made a small fortune. He told me his “secret,” or at least what worked for him.

Buy cars now that appeal to folks who are in their early 40’s, who are just coming into disposable income, and who in that bracket doesn’t want to now own the cars that their richest, most popular, high school buddies did not have drive back then?
 

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Doesn't surprise me in the least! The current generation and generations to come will continue to move further and further away from history!
 

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I tried unsuccessfully to organize a trip from Arizona to various Midwest museums, ending at the Indy 500 race (and museum). My plan was to transport 6 cars from Arizona to Bowling Green, take off from there for a week-long museum run, end at the 500, load the cars back up after the race and fly home. Sadly I couldn't get the commitments, so I'll be watching the race on TV for the 47th time and I still haven't seen some of those great museums in the Midwest. Now I feel even more urgency to do this.
 

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Count me in German. I sense the same.
 

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Just think about the future!! When the current Millennials are AARP age, there will be car museums displaying Honda Civics, Nissan Jukes, and for the super sporty crowd, a Subaru WRX.

But, to get to the museum, they will ride in a self driving car. Or maybe a Uber
 

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I tried unsuccessfully to organize a trip from Arizona to various Midwest museums, ending at the Indy 500 race (and museum). My plan was to transport 6 cars from Arizona to Bowling Green, take off from there for a week-long museum run, end at the 500, load the cars back up after the race and fly home. Sadly I couldn't get the commitments, so I'll be watching the race on TV for the 47th time and I still haven't seen some of those great museums in the Midwest. Now I feel even more urgency to do this.
And that's in a car town like Scottsdale, AZ! Yes, things are changing...and rather quickly. For those of us born in the 40's, we've been fortunate to have had a really fun ride when it comes to automobiles.:triumphant:
 

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I saw an intersting article recently that gave me some positive feelings on this, that while people in their 20’s are not getting driver’s licenses in the numbers/percentages we did, that by the time that they are in their early 30’s, many are getting the driver’s license.

Not nearly what is was for us, but more than in their 20’s, e.g., delayed obtainment.
 

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I think the unspoken question is what will happen to the value of old classic cars in the years to come if young people are no longer interested in owning them.
I sold my mint 62 TBird Sports Roadster when I bought my Z51 knowing that if I didn't find an old guy to buy it now, I'd never find one later. I loved that car, but there are no young ones looking for cars like that. The timing was perfect and exactly what I needed to buy the Stingray.
 

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I remember about 10 years ago, I had a friend (now gone) who was in his late 80s at the time. He was very excited that a Stutz Bearcat had turned up as a garage find in the area. He thought it must be worth a fortune. But it wasn't, because everyone who had ever wanted a Stutz Bearcat was either deceased, in a nursing home, or an impoverished senior citizen.
 
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