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No surprise to find these proper break in techniques are taken from GM Owners Manual. Thank you CorvetteBlogger.

How to Properly Break-In Your New 2014 Corvette Stingray

What will also not surprise you, is that there is a competing school of thought espoused by a few, the "break it in like you stole it" theory. This concept suggests that is you "baby" your car during the factory prescribed break in period, you car will be weak and wussy throughout its life, performing not as strongly as it should.

It will be no surprise that most subscribe to GM's recommendations (at least in theory, but some will admit to being a little lax in real world application to their new car). I certainly have nothing but anecdotal evidence to share regarding my purchase history of new cars, i.e., being older than the average Corvette buyer, have had time to buy and follow factory break in specs in 15 vehicles. During my time of ownership (my four current vehicles average 10+ year old and are typical of my pattern of keeping my vehicles for a while), I have never had a motor problem; have always had lower than vehicle-factory-average repair problems; have vehicles which consistently exceeded factory MPG standards (often by a lot); and yet "CONSISTENTLY EXERCISE" my rides. But, I do NOT exercise them during the break-in period!

Which of these two competing schools of thought do you follow? How are you planning to break in your StingRay?
 

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I plan on following the GM Owners Manual recommendations as I have done with each new car purchased (the most 'painful' was with my Porsche where I seem to recall having to keep it under 4k rpm for the first 1500 miles). Probably I also fall in elegant's older than the average Corvette buyer bracket and have enjoyed a variety of many different cars and makes over the years. A number of my cars have been early production orders as well (my STS '05 was the 3rd manufactured, first released to the public; my XTS '13 was one of the first private ordered released) and I have been very fortunate in not having any significant issues. I do tend to enjoy enthusiastically exercising all of my cars and RedHot will be no exception. Fortunately most of the critical break in will be accomplished in the first couple of days of my drive from the Museum back to Vegas. Yahoo :D After that I am sure their will be some 'sorting' out high speed runs in the desert. :cool:
 
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my first 500 miles will be interstate and the cruise control will be used, but I will put it in manual and constantly go back and forth between 5 and 6th gear every 20 min, (auto trans) with a blip every now and then higher but not over 4 grans. After that I will drive it normally and forget about it. When I get home with 1200 miles on it, I'll change the oil using Mobil 1 Extended performance 5w-30 and filter. Then I will forget about maintenance for several thousand miles. I don't drive much, so mileage intervals won't work for me, I'll change every 9 moths or so...
 

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I picked mine up last Friday. It is impossible to keep it up 4,000 rpm for 500 miles. Just too much fun.
 

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You'll all be interested to know that at a recent Precision Drive Event, Chevrolet did not follow its own break-in procedure. They brought about 50 Stingrays to Palm Beach International Speedway approximately 6 weeks ago and turned them over to people like me to drive as fast as possible. Both manuals and automatics were absolutely flogged for three days, all day long. The only rule was no passing. I personally reached over 140 mph and not in top gear. Revs were constantly above 5000 RPM. Mileage at the end of the weekend was just over 1000 in the cars that I tried out. The purpose of the event was mostly to introduce people with high line sports cars to the new Corvette and to demonstrate how tough and competent they are. They are tough, I didn't see any break while I was there. Competent, so competent that I literally made myself motion sick in the slalom section of the raceway. The abuse was so great that it took me a few laps to drive as the moderators encouraged, rather than as though it was my car. I imagine that those cars have gone back to the lab and are being looked at very closely. I would love to know what the findings are. Regardless, when my c7 (non z51) arrives sometime in the next two months, I intend to follow the break-in procedure that the event organizers ignored. Oh, the event was also put on in the hope that at least some of the participants would place orders. I think a lot of participants did as I did and are now anxiously awaiting their own. And when they arrive I doubt any will drive them like we did that weekend.
 

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Honestly, break in is highly overrated , it should be done of course but they is very little "damage" done if you just get in an drive it normally and forget the ritual......I am not saying taking it to the drags immediately is ok, just driving normally will be ok.
 

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I think Moto Man's method is best. It makes a lot of sense concerning the rings. What is GM's point?
 

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I think Moto Man's method is best. It makes a lot of sense concerning the rings. What is GM's point?
A lot of GM's point has to do with the fact that you are breaking in a lot more than the engine. Tranny, clutch, rear end, and brakes are also affected. The varying of speed has more to do with the rear end than the engine.

I figure if they are willing to warranty the car based on this break in, then I will follow it.
 

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I agree with Fdxpilot. Also, note that GM runs each engine for some break-in before it is married to its chassis.
 
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A lot of GM's point has to do with the fact that you are breaking in a lot more than the engine. Tranny, clutch, rear end, and brakes are also affected. The varying of speed has more to do with the rear end than the engine. I figure if they are willing to warranty the car based on this break in, then I will follow it.
When I had a one-to-one conversation with Dave Hill, previous Chief Corvette Engineer, about this very subject, he said that both tire and brake manufacturers recommend fairly easy driving for the first two hundred miles, but that his particular concern was giving the transmission and diff gears about 1,000 miles to gently wear in/mesh together before using the car's potential to its fullest.
 

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I followed GM's break-in method. I'm not an engineer so I figured it would be best to listen to the ones that are. No knock on anyone who didn't. That's just me.
 

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I followed GM's break-in method. I'm not an engineer so I figured it would be best to listen to the ones that are. No knock on anyone who didn't. That's just me.
We did too. I figure they know a lot more about the car and engine than I do. I I am happy to report that we haven't had any issues.
 

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When I had a one-to-one conversation with Dave Hill, previous Chief Corvette Engineer, about this very subject, he said that both tire and brake manufacturers recommend fairly easy driving for the first two hundred miles, but that his particular concern was giving the transmission and diff gears about 1,000 miles to gently wear in/mesh together before using the car's potential to its fullest.
This makes more sense. But now how do you get the rings to seal properly, and baby the rest of the drive train?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This makes more sense. But now how do you get the rings to seal properly, and baby the rest of the drive train?
I keep changing the RPM's during break in, such as accelerating moderately in second gear from 20 to 45 MPH, taking my foot off the gas, doing it again, going into another gear and doing similarly. (Not the most fun way to break in your new Corvette, but did it on my last two, and will do it again on my 2015 Z.) This creates a temporary "suction" or negative pressure in the cylinders, which, along with the new "oil piston squirters" in the LT1, draws additonal oil into the cyclinders. Also is consistent with GM's "no cruise control" during break in. Interesting that even with the new piston squirters that are programmed to inject more oil than usual during the break in period, GM's is still recommending we follow their specified break in process.

Not totally convinced that I am losing some HP/TQ by conservatively breaking in my cars, but even if I am losing a few HP/TQ by following GM break in procedures, I am not racing or dragging my car. Again, never had a single engine problem in 50 years of driving, with many, many years driving over 50,000 miles per year.

To each their own, and to everyone's own level of "risk/reward comfort." I agree with another forum thread post, that GM can, with the LT1's new total rev count system, monitor exactly what we have done to/with our cars, and should warranty claims occur, as verified by a my GM Tech who is the only person I will allow to work on my Z06 (and whom I consider a friend), all service techs must now review all the parameters, measurements, data, etc. before they honor a warranty claim. Hence, while I have done 29 mods to my C6 Z06, I choose which ones I was comfortable with, and which ones I choose not to do. Simply do not want to risk my paying $18K for a new Z06 motor.

Have friends who go the opposite way, adding superchargers, getting a tune, etc., and they too never have had a problem. We all get to make choices...
 

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I'm trying to follow the break in procedures to the letter. I've exceeded 4,000 RPMS only like 3-4 times so far, and I don't think that'll be changing. Mostly been driving it in Eco mode.
 

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Don't use Eco. You want all eight pistons firing.
 
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I agree with 53 vette and have not yet used Eco and am not sure if I ever will. i follow GMs recommendations. No one else has access to their test data, and they are the ones who would have to pay to repace prematurely failing engines. Theoretical advantages do not always pay off in the real world, and DATA are what count. If we all had access to GM data, we could decide. Without it I rely on their profit motive. It trumps all (or should).
 
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