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How long is everyone waiting until they really use the power of the new Stingray? The dealer told me GM stated 500 miles and keep it under 4K RPM's but the head shop guy said it was ready to go out the door.
 

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There are some threads on this topic in here. This can be a touchy subject and will have a lot of opinions. The thread containing all the info on this matter is helpful if I might add. Just type in box for your search and you should find info.
Welcome to the sight as well!
 

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GM has the following recommendations for 200, 500 and 1500 miles. They say that following these guidelines is recommended as parts have a break-in period and performance will be better in the long run.

For the first 200 Miles (322 km):

To break in new tires, drive at moderate speeds and avoid hard cornering for the first 200 miles (322 km).
New brake linings also need a break- in period. Avoid making hard stops during the first 200 miles (322 km). This is recommended every time brake linings are replaced.


For the first 500 Miles (800 km):

Avoid full throttle starts and abrupt stop.
Do not exceed 4000 rpm.
Avoid driving at any one constant speed, fast or slow, including the use of cruise control.
Avoid downshifting to brake or slow the vehicle when the engine speed will exceed 4000 rpm.
Do not let the engine labor. Never lug the engine. With a manual transmission, shift to the next lower gear. This rule applies at all times, not just during the break-in period.


For the first 1500 miles (2414 km):

Do not participate in track events, sport driving schools, or similar activities during the first 1500 miles (2414 km).
Check engine oil with every refueling and add if necessary. Oil and fuel consumption may be higher than normal during the first 1500 miles (2414 km).
 

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Yep, there are as many options on new motor run is a their are members on this site so take whatever you read here with a grain of salt. If you don't have first hand knowledge of what is involved in a new motor run it then simply follow GM's guidelines and you're good to go.

Personally having built and raced motors of virtually all flavors (15HP go cart motors to 1200HP offshore race motors) each one has a unique set of requirements but the common thread is to avoid heat buildup. That;s where the idea of varying your RPM's comes from. Motors run at a constant RPM develop hot spots that can be very detrimental to a proper run in. As far as RPM limits there really aren't any from just a motor standpoint. There's nothing about making a pull to redline that's any more stressful to the motor than accelerating on the highway to pass a car. It's the other components of the drivetrain that need time for the parts to mesh. The transmission and differential are the main reason they suggest not doing full throttle starts and the brakes are the reason for not doing hard stops, the pads need to be bedded in. Of course I can bed a set of pads in 5 minutes so the mileage related to brakes is just the engineers using a measurement the average person can understand vs. the real reason.

There's also a school of thought that says the motor needs to perform certain stress actions BEFORE things like the rings take a seat. Many manufacturers already perform this action on the checkout dyno within minutes of the car rolling off the assembly line. I have no idea if GM does. The action is hard acceleration through the RPM range to about 80% of redline followed immediately by full engine braking. This applies maximum load to the rings from both directions allowing them to seat properly to prevent compression loss and oil leakage over time. This actions should be performed at least 2 times before the motor has more than 1 hour on it to be most effective. With modern metallurgy most parts have no wear in pattern, it's only the rings that need to be seated on a modern motor. From this point the motor is run in and all you really need to care for up to 500 miles is the trans and the differential. Occasional redline runs will do no harm what so ever past the first 1 or 2 hours of motor runtime.
 

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Yep, there are as many options on new motor run is a their are members on this site so take whatever you read here with a grain of salt. If you don't have first hand knowledge of what is involved in a new motor run it then simply follow GM's guidelines and you're good to go.

There's also a school of thought that says the motor needs to perform certain stress actions BEFORE things like the rings take a seat. Many manufacturers already perform this action on the checkout dyno within minutes of the car rolling off the assembly line. I have no idea if GM does. The action is hard acceleration through the RPM range to about 80% of redline followed immediately by full engine braking. This applies maximum load to the rings from both directions allowing them to seat properly to prevent compression loss and oil leakage over time. This actions should be performed at least 2 times before the motor has more than 1 hour on it to be most effective. With modern metallurgy most parts have no wear in pattern, it's only the rings that need to be seated on a modern motor. From this point the motor is run in and all you really need to care for up to 500 miles is the trans and the differential. Occasional redline runs will do no harm what so ever past the first 1 or 2 hours of motor runtime.
When I was on the factory tour as part of RedHot's Museum delivery, every C7 coming off the line went through a dyno set up including where they ran the engine up to 70 mph and completed somewhere in the vicinity of 600 electronic related tests. :cool:
 

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When I was on the factory tour as part of RedHot's Museum delivery, every C7 coming off the line went through a dyno set up including where they ran the engine up to 70 mph and completed somewhere in the vicinity of 600 electronic related tests. :cool:
I think they use what's called the "rolling road". There are many different definitions of these types of Dyno's and in Europe most chassis dynos are incorrectly called rolling road dynos. On a rolling road dyno the power applied to the rear wheels, in the case of the C7, also drives rollers on the front. This simulates actually going down the road so traction control systems can be checked. It also means the vehicle can be driven on the rolling road without strapping it down though I believe they have stops that pop up and engage the frame to prevent movement. Of course you can't do power pulls but they needed to find a way to test everything quickly and the rolling road gives them that.

It's really cool to watch the Harley final assembly testers ride the bike up onto the dyno. press a button and "drive" on top of the rollers without any straps or supports.
 
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