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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Replacing the original battery in our C7s is a relatively easy job, especially once you first know what needs to be done. It will take you about 30 or so minutes. The only tools you will need are a flat head screw driver, 10 mm and 13 mm sockets, and some means of lifting out the original battery once disconnected. It does not have any built-in handles, so you will need either a cheap lifting strap that temporally attaches to the terminals, or the hardier sliding clamp or ‘ice block’ lifting claws. Our cars do not need to have auxiliary power supplied while you disconnect the battery. In most cases you will find that once you connect the new battery, your car alarm might go off, and you just need to press the unlock on the FOB. Then it might take a couple of cycles (on, off) for all electronics to return to their normal settings.

While I had not had any indication that the OEM battery was failing, I decided to take preventative action as she neared four years in age. There are several options available in addition to the OEM battery. I prefer to go with AGM batteries when I replace the originals in my cars. Sears carries a number of size 48 AGMs that will work, but the one I went with was from Batteries Plus, a X2 Power AGM part number SLI48AGMDP. It has a 5-year 100% replacement warranty, and 775 CCA. Here is what it looks like.

J Daum 1.jpg

A further plus for me is that it is made in the USA just like our C7s

J Daum 2.jpg

I suggest you protect your C7 from inadvertently scratching it by putting a protective cover over the trunk edge and right rear fender.

The first thing you will want to do, is to use your hand and gently pry the right-side plastic wheel well interior cover away just enough that you can comfortably slip the floor carpeting out from under it. As you can see in this photo, there are 3 attachment clips that release when you pull the cover.

View attachment Daum (1 of 12).jpg

It is important to do this so that you don’t end up ripping the carpeting where it goes under the cover. Just ease the carpeting back enough so that you have clear access to the foam hatch on top of the battery, as you can see in this image. Then just place something heavy on the folded back carpeting to keep it out of your way.

View attachment Daum (8 of 12).jpg

This is what you will see when you remove the foam cover.

View attachment Daum (2 of 12).jpg

In this image, you see the 5 sets of nuts that you will be loosening and or removing.

View attachment Daum (3 of 12).jpg

The first one is labeled 1 and is the negative ground cable. Note that it has a small additional wire attached to it (marked with a yellow arrow and caution triangle). You will loosen the 10-mm nut on the post clamp, which should allow you to slide the negative wire unit including the small wire, up off of the post. Once you do this carefully tuck the ground wire unit with the small wire out of the way.

As you can see here, I tucked it between the plastic wheel housing cover and the carpeting.

View attachment Daum (11 of 12).jpg

Next you want to undo the positive heavy-duty line that goes up to the engine. This is number 2 in the picture. Tuck that away (down between the battery and rear wall will work). Next you will be removing the nut that secures the fuse block. That is number 3. Loosen it the same way you did the negative post clamp. Now to get the fuse block to release, refer to the two green arrows in the picture at the top and bottom edge of the fuse block. Insert your flat head screw driver down into one of the slots while gently lifting the fuse block up. You should feel the catch release. Do the same on the other one and then lift the fuse block up and place it to the left of the area, out of the way. Finally, use your 13mm socket and unscrew the battery hold-down brace. These nuts are labelled 4 in the picture.

Now you should have everything disconnected from the original battery except the gas venting tube that is between the negative side and the outer wall. Just detach the tube from the elbow connector. Use your battery remover strap or clamp to lift it up and out. Be careful not to bump or hit your C7 body with it as you move it clear of your car.

Next, remove the vent hole cap from the OEM battery side (it is on the positive post side) and the vent hole elbow connector (on the negative post side) and place them in your replacement battery in the same positions.
Now you are ready to ease your new battery into the trunk floor. Remember the positive post goes to your left (with you standing facing the trunk) and the negative post on the right side.

You now reverse the steps you did above. You reattach the gas vent tube to the elbow. Put the battery hold down brace back and tighten down the nuts. (I realized I forgot to put the bracket back until I had secured the positive line to the engine, so I had to take that back off to get the bracket in properly :mask:). Next slip the fuse block assembly back over the positive terminal and push down at the top and bottom until you hear the clips ‘click.’ Then tighten the positive terminal connection (#3) down. Follow by connecting the positive line to the engine (#2), and finally the negative post assembly (with the small negative line) #1.

You should now have everything connected (your trunk light will come on when you do, and if your C7 is set to auto lock, most probably the alarm will also go off. If it does, just unlock with you FOB unlock button).
Once you are satisfied that all nuts are properly secured, replace the foam battery cover. Then gently slip the carpeting back under the plastic wheel well cover. Next, give the plastic cover a gentle thump with your hand at each of the 3 attachment clip areas. If you have them aligned, it should easily push home.

When you first start you C7 you may notice a few things are not quite right- the HUD (if you have one) may revert to its default, the outside temperature display may be --, as well as the tire pressure readings may also be --. I drove RedHot for a nice freeway drive and then shut it down. When I restarted her, the outside temperature read correctly as did my tire pressure readings. I also reset HUD to my preferred display. It is also possible that your cruise control unit has reverted to OFF. If this is the case, and you have forgotten how to turn it on (not set the speed), push in the top of the cruise control switch, not the set or resume part, but above that where you see the logo of the speedometer.

I anticipate there are other ways to do this replacement. My intent in writing this up was to share with you the way I did. If it helps you when you decide to change yours, all the better.:tranquillity:
 

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Great step by step and thanks for the pics ( it helps). This will be a keeper for me going down the road as i am sure my time is just around the corner.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great step by step and thanks for the pics ( it helps). This will be a keeper for me going down the road as i am sure my time is just around the corner.
Thank you, I appreciate the feedback. By the way, one of the things that influenced my specific battery choice was the adjusted cost of the battery over the number of years of 100% free replacement. I was actually surprised that the 5 year one I got worked out to be the least expensive per year of expected ownership.
 

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Thanks for that detailed write up. My battery is also approaching the four year mark. I just had it load tested but I may go ahead and replace it sooner rather than later. This thread will come in handy.
 

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Thanks Jeff for that really good DIY. Great helpful pictures and commentary. [I will be doing mine next fall (as mine is a '15).]

Thank you very much.

Question please, as I still remember the bloody knuckles I had getting out the '06 Z's battery (which had the smallest trunk floor opening, so tiny that GM rectified it for '07's). Using HD duct tape (Gorilla brand) and a metal spatula to stick the tape firmly to the side of the battery, I made an "upside down U" set of handles on each end of the battery, and was able to pull it up that way. As you just did removed yours, do you think that method would also work on our C7 batteries?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Jeff for that really good DIY. Great helpful pictures and commentary. [I will be doing mine next fall (as mine is a '15).]

Thank you very much.

Question please, as I still remember the bloody knuckles I had getting out the '06 Z's battery (which had the smallest trunk floor opening, so tiny that GM rectified it for '07's). Using HD duct tape (Gorilla brand) and a metal spatula to stick the tape firmly to the side of the battery, I made an "upside down U" set of handles on each end of the battery, and was able to pull it up that way. As you just did removed yours, do you think that method would also work on our C7 batteries?
Thanks John. As to your home made (and clever) battery remover, I don't know. I guess it could work if you had no substance on the side surfaces of the original battery. However, if you do decide to go that way, as soon as it was clear of the trunk opening, I would rest it on the trunk and get a full hands on grip before lifting it completely out. I did notice that battery lifter straps were under $10 and some of the clamp types were close to $10. Also, you could probably borrow from one of your automotive friends or possibly from the place you purchase the new battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wonder if vise grips on the post would lift them?
My guess is that you could use two vice grips cinched to each post to lift the battery up, but it could be awkward, plus you would have to be very careful to avoid touching any metal. I think an inexpensive post strap or the slightly more expensive claw/clamp would be a better way to go (or borrowing from a friend or the place you are purchasing the new battery).
 

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This is an extremely useful thread, Jeff. Thank you for doing it.

Do you have any pictures of the venting tube?
 

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Jeff, great detailed write-up that will come in handy for many. I remember when our battery went south during the first six months of ownership, I lifted the carpet and that foam cover was cracked in three different places, our local Chevrolet dealership replaced it for free. So be cautious of what you place in the corner where the battery is located, weight related.

SF
Rick
 

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Thanks Jeff
Thanks for taking the time to create the great tutorial.

One last tip that I'm not sure is necessary with modern batteries, but in the past when I've replaced a battery, I always put the new battery on a low charge for at least a day before I install it.
If you have the time, it can't hurt.

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
This is an extremely useful thread, Jeff. Thank you for doing it.

Do you have any pictures of the venting tube?
Thanks Rodney. On closer examination it turns out I did capture the tube and elbow. The tube comes up from the bottom where it exits the floor, and remains attached to the body. Here it is

Daum (1 of 1).jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Jeff
Thanks for taking the time to create the great tutorial.

One last tip that I'm not sure is necessary with modern batteries, but in the past when I've replaced a battery, I always put the new battery on a low charge for at least a day before I install it.
If you have the time, it can't hurt.

Jack
Thanks Jack. Very good suggestion, especially if you are not sure of the condition of the new battery at time of purchase. The CTEKs maintainer many of us have will do a perfect job of ensuring the new battery is fully charged if you connect it to the battery before installing it. That is also why after installing a new battery, I always take my cars out for a nice freeway cruise and then bring them home and put the CTEK on. Remember also, that the CTEK has a different setting for AGMs than it does for regular flooded batteries. :eek:nthego:
 

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Thanks for posting Jeff. Like your choice of battery and I'll probably go the same route. Not yet convinced that the Optima batteries are any better than standard. Is it really that hard to just grip the corners and pull up to remove it? At least it looks much easier than it is to change the battery in the C4.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for posting Jeff. Like your choice of battery and I'll probably go the same route. Not yet convinced that the Optima batteries are any better than standard. Is it really that hard to just grip the corners and pull up to remove it? At least it looks much easier than it is to change the battery in the C4.
Most welcome. I think it would be difficult for to get sufficient grip between the battery and opening walls to lift it out with just your hands, for the majority of people.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Jeff, great detailed write-up that will come in handy for many. I remember when our battery went south during the first six months of ownership, I lifted the carpet and that foam cover was cracked in three different places, our local Chevrolet dealership replaced it for free. So be cautious of what you place in the corner where the battery is located, weight related.

SF
Rick
Thanks Rick. My guess is that the foam cover might not have been properly placed in your masterpiece originally, so it was not sitting supported all the way around. Then when something was put on it, it gave way. When it is in correctly it appears that it can be treated like the rest of the floor. I regularly put my fully loaded golf bag across that area and have no damage to the foam.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm just glad your lil red Corvette will be ready for my visit on Saturday so you can take me of a tour of your home town!
You're on Mike :) but of course that means sacrificing part of the President's Cup :cool:
 

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Most welcome. I think it would be difficult for to get sufficient grip between the battery and opening walls to lift it out with just your hands, for the majority of people.
I wonder if member SSGhost has the finger strength to push hard enough to get enough friction to do it. Given that he pushes his brake caliper pistons back with his fingers, I would not be surprised if he could do this as well...
 
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