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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I periodically to check the tires as well as visually the suspension, brakes, etc, by jacking one end of RedHot via the jack point at a time. [click on any image to automatically enlarge it]

© JwDaum (3 of 3).JPG © JwDaum (2 of 3).JPG

Having just done it again it reminded me of some simple but important steps to follow that might be of value to those members trying it for the first time:

  • if you have 2LT or 3LT with the enhanced alarm system, be sure to turn off the tilt sensor (it is located next to the trunk release left side of your dash) or your horn will go off as you lift one side of your C7.
  • chock the same side wheel that you will not be jacking
  • loosen slightly all the lug nuts on the wheel you are about to jack before jacking
  • be sure that you have either a jacking puck on your jack plate or the type that hooks into your frame at the jacking point (otherwise your jack plate will likely do serious damage to the frame)
  • raise the wheel/tire so that it just clears your floor with the jack- an inch or so is all you need
  • remove all of the lug nuts and lift the wheel carefully towards you so that you don't damage the stud thread
  • after checking your tire, and if you want, visually check all suspension components and brake pads, clean the wheel barrel (much easier to do with the wheel off)
  • per your Owners Manual instructions, put a little anti-friction grease on the hub (not on the studs!) to prevent corrosion
© JwDaum (1 of 3).JPG © JwDaum (3 of 3).JPG

- now lift your wheel/tire while aligning the wheel stud openings with the studs
(you can use a wheel dolly to help if you own one
264316d1533746412-jacking-up-corner-dollyresize.jpg (photo courtesy of texhawk)
or get stud extenders
264338d1533761444-jacking-up-corner-156204509.jpg (photo courtesy of meyerweb
to assist if you'd like) and carefully slide on (without sliding the wheel across the threads)
  • start all the lug nuts by finger
  • start to tighten the lug nuts while ensuring the wheel is firmly up against the hub. Tighten in the recommended pattern in your Owners Manual until firm
Wheel lug nut related.jpg
  • lower your C7 back down
  • now use a torque wrench set to 100 lb ft and tighten in the recommended pattern until your torque wrench clicks or reads 100 lb ft
  • go out and enjoy your handy work :) After 500 or so miles, recheck each lug nut with your torque wrench to make sure they are still at 100 lb ft.

Repeat with each wheel. When you are finished, remember to set your torque wrench back to zero (if it is a mechanical torque wrench) until you need it again.
 

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Thx! Great write-up & pics … but … what are you referring to when you say to clean the 'wheel barrel'? That's a term I'm not familiar with. Thx!
 

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Thx! Great write-up & pics … but … what are you referring to when you say to clean the 'wheel barrel'? That's a term I'm not familiar with. Thx!
Wheel barrel is the inside of the rim behind the spokes that most people don't clean.
 
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Good information here, jsvette. I did not know that about the "tilt" sensor.

I think the caution against using wheel bearing grease on the bolts is good, but I would recommend using anti-seize lubricant on them. By minimizing friction as you tighten the lug nuts, your torque reading will be more accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good information here, jsvette. I did not know that about the "tilt" sensor.

I think the caution against using wheel bearing grease on the bolts is good, but I would recommend using anti-seize lubricant on them. By minimizing friction as you tighten the lug nuts, your torque reading will be more accurate.
Sounds logical but the manual clearly says you should not get any grease on the bolts:

Wheel lug nut related.jpg
 
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I think the caution against using wheel bearing grease on the bolts is good, but I would recommend using anti-seize lubricant on them. By minimizing friction as you tighten the lug nuts, your torque reading will be more accurate.
There are differing opinions on this. Per the TireRack, "Once you have completed your test fit, we suggest removing the wheel and applying a thin coating of anti-seize around the axle hubs to help prevent rust and permit easier removal when it's time to rotate your tires. Do not apply anti-seize compound to the lug hardware or studs."

The argument against using anti-seize that I've heard is that the lugs are dry torque fasteners, and that by using a lubricant (anti-seize compound in this case) you can over-torque them.

Here's another perspective on this: "If you do apply lubricant, make sure to do so carefully and only to the threads. Never allow any lubricant on the mating surfaces of the nut or the lughole of the wheel.

Much of the “stickiness” brought about by proper torque comes not from the threads but from the contact between mating surfaces. Even a thin film of oil between those surfaces can create a hydraulic barrier, preventing proper torque from being applied. This can also make it easier for the nut to work itself loose.
"

As for my own practice, I'm known for liberally applying anti-seize when I work on my vehicles, but I don't use it on my wheel lugs...

My $0.02
 
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There are differing opinions on this. Per the TireRack, "Once you have completed your test fit, we suggest removing the wheel and applying a thin coating of anti-seize around the axle hubs to help prevent rust and permit easier removal when it's time to rotate your tires. Do not apply anti-seize compound to the lug hardware or studs."

The argument against using anti-seize that I've heard is that the lugs are dry torque fasteners, and that by using a lubricant (anti-seize compound in this case) you can over-torque them.

Here's another perspective on this: "If you do apply lubricant, make sure to do so carefully and only to the threads. Never allow any lubricant on the mating surfaces of the nut or the lughole of the wheel.

Much of the “stickiness” brought about by proper torque comes not from the threads but from the contact between mating surfaces. Even a thin film of oil between those surfaces can create a hydraulic barrier, preventing proper torque from being applied. This can also make it easier for the nut to work itself loose.
"

As for my own practice, I'm known for liberally applying anti-seize when I work on my vehicles, but I don't use it on my wheel lugs...

My $0.02
Please allow me to modify my original statement to read: "I would recommend against using anti-seize lubricant on wheel lugs."

It is a cold, rainy day in north Texas, and I have a lot of time to research this. So, from this:
Anti seize on lug nuts ?? Got a bad scare. Got lucky. in General Board
this: https://community.cartalk.com/t/which-anti-seize-for-the-wheel-nuts/104743
this: https://ericthecarguy.com/kunena/8-Service-and-Repair-Questions-Answered-Here/47307-anti-seize-on-lug-nuts
and this: https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=229718
...I am becoming convinced that it is best to follow Chevrolet's instructions/warning about lubricating wheel studs.

By the way, only that last link discusses the matter from an engineering perspective.
 
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On a side note, always remember to use titanium-based tools when working on your SR-71 at home. :)

"Titanium alloy was the only metal suited to the Blackbird's frame because it is strong and durable, but relatively light. Skunk Works soon discovered it was a tricky material to work with. When it came into contact with cadmium-plated steel tools in the production line, Titanium became brittle and was prone to shattering. Lockheed had to develop new titanium tools to build these planes, and arranged special training courses for Blackbird machinists." 25 surprising facts about the SR-71 Blackbird
 
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Wheel barrel is the inside of the rim behind the spokes that most people don't clean.
I on the other hand jack up my car and clean mine weekly like picture here. the part where my yellow rag is resting is the wheel barrel
20151212_115659.jpg
 

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On a side note, always remember to use titanium-based tools when working on your SR-71 at home. :)

"Titanium alloy was the only metal suited to the Blackbird's frame because it is strong and durable, but relatively light. Skunk Works soon discovered it was a tricky material to work with. When it came into contact with cadmium-plated steel tools in the production line, Titanium became brittle and was prone to shattering. Lockheed had to develop new titanium tools to build these planes, and arranged special training courses for Blackbird machinists." 25 surprising facts about the SR-71 Blackbird
Yeah, I tried to buy those on Amazon, but had trouble finding them.

Another fun fact about the SR-71 is that all the titanium used to build the fleet was sourced from the Soviet Union, purchased through shell companies. When asked what they were making with all that titanium, the Soviets were told, "pizza ovens". (From Skunk Works, by Ben R. Rich)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the insertion of humor, but let's keep posts on this thread on topic: REMOVING YOUR WHEEL (AND TIRE) FOR FIRST TIMERS.
 

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Good information here, jsvette. I did not know that about the "tilt" sensor.

I think the caution against using wheel bearing grease on the bolts is good, but I would recommend using anti-seize lubricant on them. By minimizing friction as you tighten the lug nuts, your torque reading will be more accurate.
You should never use any type of lubricant on threads. All wheel torque specs are for clean and dry threads. Use any lubricant even anti-seize compounds may lead to over-torquing which will create all sorts of problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You should never use any type of lubricant on threads. All wheel torque specs are for clean and dry threads. Use any lubricant even anti-seize compounds may lead to over-torquing which will create all sorts of problems.
Absolutely correct, as already discussed: see post #5 in this thread and again the image from the Owners Manual as also previously posted

276098
 
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