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Ohio. Have always stored my Vettes (5) over the years by inflating the tires 8-10 pounds high. Never had a problem.
 

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I plan to store my 2015 Corvette stingray in a heated garage for the six month winter up in Minnesota. I just put on new A/S3+ tires. The tire salesman suggested I put the car on jackstands during the storage so that the tires wouldn’t get flat spots. I also know there are products out there that you can roll the car onto to keep the tires from flat spotting. Is this necessary? What do you think?
I am sure there are lots of replies. Personally, I leave the tires on the car and I live in northern IL and my garage is not heated. The flat spots on modern tires will go away.

With that said Michelin does recommend that you take the tire off of the car and stack them or ideally hang. Tire Storage | Michelin The easiest option I have seen used. Buy another set of wheels (cheap), put your old tires on those wheels and then swap the two sets. This is an expensive option but avoids impacting the suspension with odd angles.
 

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I plan to store my 2015 Corvette stingray in a heated garage for the six month winter up in Minnesota. I just put on new A/S3+ tires. The tire salesman suggested I put the car on jackstands during the storage so that the tires wouldn’t get flat spots. I also know there are products out there that you can roll the car onto to keep the tires from flat spotting. Is this necessary? What do you think?
I have stored many many cars without elevating or using special tire holders over the past 40 years. Rarely has a flat spot developed. The few times it did, the flat spot disappeared in the first few miles. My C7 has not experienced flat spotting. For one thing, the car is quite light and tires super wide. Flat spotting is most likely with skinny bias ply tires.
 

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I plan to store my 2015 Corvette stingray in a heated garage for the six month winter up in Minnesota. I just put on new A/S3+ tires. The tire salesman suggested I put the car on jackstands during the storage so that the tires wouldn’t get flat spots. I also know there are products out there that you can roll the car onto to keep the tires from flat spotting. Is this necessary? What do you think?
Do not put your car on jackstands for a number of reasons..

By flat spot stoppers to keep your tires from getting flat spots and they’ll last forever. I’m on my third Corvette and this is a grand sport and I’ve been using them religiously. About 250 bucks
 

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I plan to store my 2015 Corvette stingray in a heated garage for the six month winter up in Minnesota. I just put on new A/S3+ tires. The tire salesman suggested I put the car on jackstands during the storage so that the tires wouldn’t get flat spots. I also know there are products out there that you can roll the car onto to keep the tires from flat spotting. Is this necessary? What do you think?
If you don’t already know, 1/4 tank of gas for long term storage. Not a full tank.
 

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I plan to store my 2015 Corvette stingray in a heated garage for the six month winter up in Minnesota. I just put on new A/S3+ tires. The tire salesman suggested I put the car on jackstands during the storage so that the tires wouldn’t get flat spots. I also know there are products out there that you can roll the car onto to keep the tires from flat spotting. Is this necessary? What do you think?

Wow. 2014 Premier vert.
We've stored the Green Hornet in both hot and cold settings. Cold has caused no issues after inflation raised for cold storage in Wyoming. But, I have permanently flat spotted golf cart tires, new Michelin tires on a Honda Accord, regular 10k mile tires on a different Honda in my garage in Phoenix area during hot summer. I have to remove wheels or jack stand under suspension to avoid issues.
Butch
 

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The suspension is not designed to hang at those angles for an extended period of time. You are also likely topping out the shocks which can cause them to fail. The image below shows the suspension at normal suspension angles. Notice how the A arms are basically parallel to the ground this is the position the suspension was deigned to be most of the time. The lower picture (Ignore the arrows), while not totally clear,shows the angle of the suspension when it hangs. This puts everything in angles that it was not designed to support. If you draw a line between the upper and lower ball joints in the top picture and compare it to the lower pciture you can see the angular forces at work. Additionally, the components that 'hold' the suspension 'up' when it is hanging we never deigned to hold that load. Hope that helps.


278026

278027
 

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Thanks Stoan! (y)
 

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Thank you very much Sloan. This was a very helpful picture and I will share this information with the tire shop in the future.
 

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Thank you very much Sloan. This was a very helpful picture and I will share this information with the tire shop in the future.
One thing I forgot to mention is that the information is specific to Corvette. Some cars you can put blocks directly under the lower ball joints. This is not an approved lift points for a Corvette.
 
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