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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If you do not want to read through all of this post, here is the ‘skinny’: 3 sun shade options were tested to determine their effectiveness in blocking heat transmitted through the transparent roof panel. The 3 are shades (in alpha order) by Canvas Works HeatShield, CLR Dot Matrix film and TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade. Compared with the unblocked transparent panel, the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade and the Canvas Works HeatShield units block about equivalently the greatest amount of heat. None of the 3 options had any significant reduction in interior ambient noise (note: none of the manufacturers claim that their unit reduces interior noise; I thought they might). Ease of use varies as well. Which one you might want to consider will depend on several variables discussed below.

Caveat: All opinions expressed here are solely my own and do not necessarily reflect those of this forum’s management nor those of the respective manufacturers.

The alternative solutions discussed here are:

Dot Matrix film applied CRL dot matrix installed.jpg
HeatShield applied HeatShield.JPG
HeatShield and TheDoubleAA shade side to interior.jpg Side to panel.jpg
TheDoubleAA shade applied SoCarParts.jpg
-CRL Static Cling Dot Matrix Window film. Cost about $18 to $40 (depending on whether you buy and cut the film yourself or purchase one already cut for the Stingray)
-Canvas Works HeatShield roof shade Cost $39
-TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade Cost $149

Ease of installation and removal, how secure are they, and can you leave it on when storing the roof panel?: The easiest to install was TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade, that is, once you got it into the Stingray. TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade is essentially a non-foldable fairly rigid unit, though it has some flex. It comes with 12 clear 1 ½” suction cups attached permanently to the side that faces the roof panel. So to put it up, you position it and then push in the general area of each cup to secure it. The next easiest to install was the Canvas Works HeatShield that, similar to their reflector windshield sun shield, is flexible and stores rolled up. The roof panel version is supplied with a package of 1” clear suction cups and instructions (very straight forward) on how to put them on the Canvas Works HeatShield permanently. Once you have mounted the suction cups you just unroll, position and press on the areas of the suction cups. The hardest to install relatively speaking was the CRL Dot Matrix film. To do it correctly you had to remove the roof panel. See my prior write-up at for details on customizing the film.http://www.stingrayforums.com/forum/stingray-how-s-guides/4281-transparent-panel-sun-guard-2.html post #1 .

Once installed, none of the 3 options interferes with the removal and storage of the transparent panel in the back of your Stingray if you chose to leave the respective sun shade attached.

Ease of removing each of the 3 options varied as you might expect. The easiest to remove was the CRL Dot Matrix, you just gently pull it off (though storing it was another matter- you probably want to roll it around a piece of plastic sheet to prevent introducing creases), followed by the Canvas Works HeatShield (you just pull it off, releasing the suction cups as you go and roll it up). The TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade unit was the hardest to remove because the suction cups really stay well stuck and you have to basically pull back the panel and slide your hand between it and the roof until you find each suction cup and release its suction. Storing TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade requires the same space (foot print) as the roof panel since you cannot fold or roll it up.

None of the 3 options will release on their own and drop down if installed correctly on the roof panel.

Impact on panel: None of the 3 options required any modification to the panel. Nor did attaching and removing any of them impact the finish of the panel. The TheDoubleAA.com DSV unit did result in higher temperatures being recorded both on the inside of the panel (cabin side) and externally on the panel surface by about 20 degrees inside and 15 to 20 degrees outside (probably a result of the charcoal/black finish of the DSV unit as compared to the aluminum reflective coating of the HeatShield and the dot matrix surface of the film). However, that moderate increase in temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the panel.
Fit and finish: The TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade looks very much like it is part of the original interior. Very well manufactured and finished. When it is in place you would think it is OEM and an integral part of the roof panel. The Canvas Works HeatShield unit looks just like their reflector windshield unit, and fits well and is nicely finished, though I would recommend that the manufacturer ship the unit with the suction cups already affixed. Like their windshield unit, it is not designed to ‘blend in’ but more of a Bauhaus style functionality (it is made of the identical material as the windshield HeatShield unit). The same can be said for the CRL Dot Matrix film, simple and functional. My hand cut version is not as professional as it could be, however you can buy the same already cut to fit the Stingray.

From the outside looking at the Stingray you cannot really see the difference in any of the options until you are close up. Then the Dot Matrix in combination with the existing panel tint looks similar to carbon fiber. The HeatShield unit looks reflective to a degree (but nowhere as reflective as the windshield version since the panel is more heavily tinted from the factory) and the DSV unit cannot be seen at all except that you cannot see through the panel as you can with it off.

Results: The most ‘telling’ impact of using one of the options was in the temperature as measured at the consul. The TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade and Canvas Works HeatShield options both had reduced the measured temperature by about 10 degrees at the one hour mark over either the CRL Dot Matrix or using no option. After two hours again the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade and Canvas Works HeatShield options both had still reduced the temperature by about 10 degrees over either the CRL Dot Matrix or using no option even though the actual temperature at the consul had increased about another 10 degrees for all options. The black TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade appears to have trapped and heated the air between it and the panel more than the silver reflective HeatShield, resulting in resulting in about a 20 degree hotter measurement both inside at the panel and on the outside of the panel after the two hours. The HeatShield ended up having a lower measured temperature at the inside of the panel and the outside of the panel as compared to the remaining two options. But note that the temperature as measured at the consul was still basically the same for both the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade and Canvas Works HeatShield options in spite of the panel being hotter for the DSV.

Use/Application: The real value of any of these options is to a great degree driven by where you live and drive your Stingray. Here in the desert I never park any of my cars outside without putting up a windshield sun shield. The transparent panel presents different choices. I really like the view and ‘airy’ feeling of looking out of the roof panel and the light coming through it when I have it on. During most of the year (maybe 8 months) I don’t feel the need to block the heat coming through it when driving or when parked. The only option of the 3 that allows light to come through (but not an unobstructed view) is the Dot Matrix film and it also reduces the heat transmitted through the panel that hits the top of your head while driving.
If you want maximum heat block while parked then you would want to consider either the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade or Canvas Works HeatShield options. If you like the light and unobstructed view while driving, the Canvas Works HeatShield roof panel unit is probably your best option, though of course requiring you to put it up once you park. If seeing out the panel while driving is not a high priority during the ‘hot’ months and for you do not want to have to put up a sun shield every time you park, then you should consider putting on the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade unit at the start of the heat season and not removing it until the end of the season. Both the Dot Matrix film and the DVS shade are ones I do not think you would want to use if you plan on frequently (as in every time you drive and park your car) putting them on and taking them off.

Summary: Depending on your objectives there are viable options available to reduce heat transfer through our transparent roof panels. The data while factual do not capture or reflect the subjective quality of the options. By that I mean it seemed to feel that the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade and Canvas Works HeatShield blocked more heat than they actually did, and the cabin seemed quieter with them in place although the Db data does not back that up. In the end of course, if you are parking your Stingray outside in extreme heat all day, ultimately the interior is going to get quite hot from the thermal energy absorbed and passed through the rest of the car regardless of what you do with the roof panel. The most significant heat block is a windshield sun shade, because of the total exposed area and lack of windshield tint comparable to the factory level in the transparent panel, and then combine that with either the TheDoubleAA.com DSV Custom Transparent roof shade or Canvas Works HeatShield. It is further possible that different results might have been produced it the windows were left open an inch or so. I leave that experiment to someone else.
Driving with any of the three options installed on the panel does reduce the heat coming through the panel. I found I could comfortably set my AC a degree or two warmer and still feel as cool as compared to having none of the options on the panel and allowing the thermal transfer to occur.

Finally, all three options significantly reduce the UV pass through, with the two solid ones totally blocking it passing through the panel to the interior of the cabin.
If you have questions, feel free to ask. If I thoroughly confused you, sorry ;) :cool:

The data:

temp data.jpg
*Key to ambient temperature listing: ‘95/105’= shade/full sun readings
“a”= digital remote link dropped
ext= exterior

Digital temperature sensor placed on center consul, second one placed just below transparent roof panel or between roof panel and option, external temperature of panel measured by infrared Raytek MT6. All tests conducted starting at noon in full sun, all windows closed, continued for 2 hours without opening any door. All static tests conducted with Heat Shield windshield sun screen in place since my real interest was in the effectiveness of blocking solar heat pass through the panel. The 2 hours cycle was chosen because I was more interested in measuring the pass through heat from the panel and felt that after 2 hours internal readings reflected the fact that the entire car was passing heat through to the interior.

Option.jpg
All Db testing was done with radio off, AC & fan off, the drive Mode set to Tour and the NPP set to be always on. Sound measurements were made once the car was on cruise control at the specified speed, and windows closed. The meter was mounted at head height between my head and the driver window. All measurements were taken on the same stretch of road/highway.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Glen, though I was hoping for a greater reduction in the interior temperatures. Really hadn't thought about how much heat comes in from other areas including of course the body. But it was fun doing (except for the couple of hours each test day that I couldn't be driving her).
 

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Thanks Glen, though I was hoping for a greater reduction in the interior temperatures. Really hadn't thought about how much heat comes in from other areas including of course the body. But it was fun doing (except for the couple of hours each test day that I couldn't be driving her).

So.........which one?

As I'd like just the sun outta my eyes, I'd prob do the dot matrix...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So.........which one?
I refer you to my Use/Application paragraph :). Actually for me it is really going to be switching among the options. I like the fact the film allows light in and blocks heat which is great for driving, but when I am parked then it will be either the HeatShield or the DSV Custom to block out heat during the summer here.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Andrew.
 

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Jeff, those were an extremely useful set of experiments, with a very thorough report! Thank you very much for sharing that!

As I had speculated some months ago, the dark material on the TheDoubleAA.com DSV roof shade caused the temperature between the shade and the transparent roof panel to increase. What I really wish that company would do is use a reflective material on the top-facing portion of the shade. Of they ever do that, I think that would be my choice. Otherwise, I think my choice would be the Canvas Works HeatShield.

Again, thank you very much for such a well thought out set of experiments, and sharing your results with us so we can draw our own conclusions.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Rodney. Good suggestion.:cool:
 

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jeff, Outstanding research and write up!! I guess you can be the "Official Desert Test Mule" for the forum.Why can't the transparent panel be tinted, is it because of the materials it's made of?

SF
Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #11
jeff, Outstanding research and write up!! I guess you can be the "Official Desert Test Mule" for the forum.Why can't the transparent panel be tinted, is it because of the materials it's made of?

SF
Rick
Thanks Rick. Gladly accept the challenge- GM already brings a lot of its prototypes out here to Death Valley for testing, what't one more :D tester. Yes according to the window tinting companies that I have talked to there is no film they can permanently apply to the underside of the panel that will stay. :cool:
 

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Awesome write up Jsvette! After reading your post about installing the dot matrix, I actually ended up deciding on the non dotted Gila 5% Peel and Cling film. I installed it a few days ago and have not driven with it yet so can't comment on results. From looking at it, the panel is pretty much blacked out now though. I'm going for a drive soon today so I'll find out for sure if it helps. This Phoenix sun is brutal!! Thanks for the idea.
 

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Awesome write up Jsvette! After reading your post about installing the dot matrix, I actually ended up deciding on the non dotted Gila 5% Peel and Cling film. I installed it a few days ago and have not driven with it yet so can't comment on results. From looking at it, the panel is pretty much blacked out now though. I'm going for a drive soon today so I'll find out for sure if it helps. This Phoenix sun is brutal!! Thanks for the idea.
Thanks JFly! Interested to hear what you find with the Gila 5% Peel and Cling film, it sounds like a viable additional alternative.:cool:
 

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I live in AZ and need something like a sun shade when parking the car at work. I ordered a C7 with the painted top but it would be nice to have a simple sun shade that I could easily remove to jump in and go. I have seen these for other cars and earlier vettes but nothing yet for the C7. Anyone find something?
 

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davem, if you are talking about a windshield sun shade, HeatShield makes one specifically for the C7 windshield. I discussed it earlier in this and another post. It works very well and rolls up when you are not using it similar to other HeatShield sun screens.
 
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Boy, I can't find anything. I guess I am going to have to go with the California Poptop.
 

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