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Discussion Starter #1
I have to purchase a new tools box as someone's taken my last one :mad:
It had the U.S. and Metric systems inside... Please let me know if GM uses Metric or U.S. measurements bolts in the C7.

Thank you.
 

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Can't find any comprehensive info with respect to size bolts and fasteners used on the 2014's, my suggestion would be get a good set with both. I've learned over the years to keep both, and when I work I take both respective sizes and use the one that fits the best.
 

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US manufacturers went 100% metric starting in the '70's. I don't believe that are any SAE size fasteners on the C7.
 

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Yelp, the U.S.A. is slowly moving to metric, one inch at a time. :)
 

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I had standard and metric on my Camaro's.

It's always best to have sets of both, Standard and Metric.

BUT I will go metric kicking and screaming. Next thing you know, the UN will be making us drive on the wrong side of the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to all ! I decide to go to both systems :)
 

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I had standard and metric on my Camaro's.

It's always best to have sets of both, Standard and Metric.

BUT I will go metric kicking and screaming. Next thing you know, the UN will be making us drive on the wrong side of the road.
Did you hear about the young girl who wanted to buy something for her Dad for Christmas, but didn't know what to get. So she looked through some of his tools, saw a pattern of missing things, and got a great idea.

So she went to the store and showed the guy working there one of her Dad's 3/8 inch socket and said, "I want to complete my Dad's set of these things. He only has half of them, the ones which start with odd numbers. I want to get him the even numbered ones."
 

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I agree! Cars have used "meteric" for many years. I always reach for my metric tools when I work on the Vette (did with my C6 as well) and was surprised when I put a gas bib on the C7 and took out my metric Allen wrenches. The 2.5 mm was too big and the 2 mm was too small! 2.5 mm = 0.098 inches, so I tried a 3/32 (0.093 inches) and it fit fine. The folks in Europe will have trouble finding a 3/32 Allen wrench! Since we are the last country in the world not on SI (new name for metric) not may places need both! Then again since we make less and less we’ll be all metric sooner than later!
 

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You mean 25.39999999997257 mm? :cool:
Yeah. This forum is a tough bunch. Remind me to never try to do standup comedy. I tried twice in this thread, and failed miserably both times... :(
 
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My attempted jokes in is thread were not based on a true story.
 

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Yeah. This forum is a tough bunch. Remind me to never try to do standup comedy. I tried twice in this thread, and failed miserably both times... :(
You were right! One problem with conversion to SI (Metric is now called International Standard - reversed words as they do in Europe!) is the calculator. You should only use enough significant digits to represent the “intended accuracy.” I just became Chair of our tech societies SI practices committee! The example I just put in our latest draft document to reinforce the need to limit significant figures to the ”intended” measure was if someone stays place the fork 1 inch from the plate when setting up the dinner table, 25 mm is the conversion, not 25.4!
Been on that committee since 1972! Things were moving along, we switched soda and whisky bottles etc to liters (which remain to this day.) Then in some parts of the country they switched gasoline purchase to liters! That created an uproar and ended all conversation activity! Since our US standards on welding bridges and buildings, etc. are used all over the world, we have to use SI or in some cases dual dimension documents.
Keep posting, it’s fun to see the comments!
 

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Yep, we still have folks like my mother-in-law (rest her soul) who felt converting metric speed limits to mph to know how fast she was going was too complicated. Not in a million years would she gasp the concept that converting metric signs would not be necessary, rather we would become accustomed to kph as a new frame of reference. Yup, this metric stuff being base 10 is really confusing compared to ounce (16 05 32), quart/pound, pint, gallon, tom is SOO much simpler...NOT!!

Seems most things I wrench is a mix od SAE and metric.
 

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Well, why we use base 10 (from human anatomy) instead of base 16 (much more logical from a computational standpoint) is a whole different story.

Talk about ever trying to change that!
 

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Tools ?? What are tools?
I pay someone who has the right tools
who has a lift and knows what they are
doing. I tend to break things.
 

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Yep, we still have folks like my mother-in-law (rest her soul) who felt converting metric speed limits to mph to know how fast she was going was too complicated. Not in a million years would she gasp the concept that converting metric signs would not be necessary, rather we would become accustomed to kph as a new frame of reference. Yup, this metric stuff being base 10 is really confusing compared to ounce (16 05 32), quart/pound, pint, gallon, tom is SOO much simpler...NOT!!

Seems most things I wrench is a mix od SAE and metric.
Funny, we were close in the late 1700’s! Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson strongly supported decimal measurement and decimal currency. In fact, in 1790 George Washington in his first annual message to Congress reminded the legislators “Uniformity in the currency, weights, and measures of the United States is an object of great importance, and will, I am persuaded, be duly attended to.”
A mixture of British pounds and shillings, Spanish doubloons and Dutch gulders were in use! They were successful in having a decimal currency but not the decimal measurement system they also promoted. Since they were both bankers-"follow the money!"
 

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I have to purchase a new tools box as someone's taken my last one :mad:
It had the U.S. and Metric systems inside... Please let me know if GM uses Metric or U.S. measurements bolts in the C7.

Thank you.
Here is a bit of car metric bolt trivia. Had to put a TH400 in my Street Rod to handle the 567 ft-lbs of torque (in stock form) of the 502/502 big block (note the LT1 has “only” 465 ft-lbs!) With the long tube headers and carb mods mine exceeds 567. At the time I built it (2000) it was the only practicle transmission to use (yep of my 15 standard shift cars I’ve owned my fastest 0-60 has an automatic trans!)
That 3 speed, aluminum case TH400 was in all automatic trans GM muscle cars starting in 1964 and was phased out when they were being phased out in the early 1980’s in favor of 4 speeds, overdrive etc. However when I went to bolt it into the GM rear trans mount, couldn’t find a bolt to fit. Chevy parts was no help but the fellow who built the racing transmission knew it was metric! Turns out there are three not two metric pitch sizes: coarse, fine and extra fine! Bought all three to see which one would fit! Why was this trans using metric bolts when no other bolts in US cars of that era were metric? Perhaps because they sold the TH400 to Rolls Royce from 1965 to 1980 and even to Ferrari for their model 400 from 1976 to 1989! In fact it was used in RV’s after it was discontinued in cars since it could handle the torque!
HQ JPEG.jpg
 

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Another tidbit of useless trivia regarding the TH400. When GM licensed the TH400 to Rolls Royce they built one in the Rolls factory and it wouldn't shift. GM flew an engineer over to evaluate it. Turns out Rolls built it exactly to spec but the design was intended to deal with manufacturing tolerances back then. When built exactly to spec the hydraulics ran at such a high pressure the valves were overloaded. The solution, build slop into the construction.
 

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I've lived in a metric world for decades, Canada switched over in the 70's. Not sure that it made anything better at all, I grew up in the U.S. system, switched to metric as a teenager and feel like all it did was add some confusion to a generation. My kids think metric though and it seems natural to them. I still can't think in centigrade when it comes to temperature and will likely go to my 6ft/ 1.83m deep grave still confused :)
 
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