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How does the Z51 stack up against the base model? Do you think it will be worth the extra $$$ for the performance/looks?
 

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HI there,

Depends on what part of the model you are talking about.

We already know about the braking system changes, 7 speed manual gear ratio differences, axle/trans/diff cooler assemblies.

But the biggest thing I would want is that electronically controlled limited slip differential. Thats a HUGE factor in driving fast.

IMO, yes, I would up the ante for the Z51.

Alllthebest, TCM
 

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... the biggest thing I would want is that electronically controlled limited slip differential. Thats a HUGE factor in driving fast.

IMO, yes, I would up the ante for the Z51.

Alllthebest, TCM
This is an option, right? Does the standard "base" car have the old school posi?
 

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From what I have seen, its still a Getrag normal pressure biased rear differential.

Allthebest, TCM
 

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Does anyone know for sure yet about the limited slip differential? I only see the E-LSD under standard for the Z51, does the base not have a LSD at all?
 

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In my opinion Z51 is well worth the extra $$$ Matter of fact I would say its a bargain. In addition to many of the features listed above is larger wheels and tires, larger rotors and aero pacakage with rear spoiler. Considering the $2800.00 difference you could easily eat that much $$$ if you decided to change tires and wheels on a stock Vette.
 

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Does anyone know for sure yet about the limited slip differential? I only see the E-LSD under standard for the Z51, does the base not have a LSD at all?
The base non-Z51 does not get the ELSD.
 

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What is the difference between a limited slip differential and an electronic limited slip differential? Much improvement or minor?
 

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ELSD can go from full lock to wide open and anywhere in between in a microsecond! ELSD can also be part of a broader system in the new Vette with traction control, tire temperature etc..
 

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I am new to Corvette and its history but have been learning about them recently and know that the C5 and C6 both came factory standard with LSD (Limited Slip Differential: "Positraction": a GM-coined term). Corvette has utilized LSDs for decades as the technology is not new and dates back at least to the 1960s (Ferrari has used it for at least that long).

The differences are:

LSD: There is a clutch mechanism within normal LSDs that engages when the first wheel starts to slip. This is old-skool derived and called "Positraction" in the muscle car world. The C6 and most all other Corvettes use a friction based clutch pack. They are spring loaded on the C3, C4, C5, and C6, and apparently on the base C7.

VLSD: Viscous Limited Slip differential (common in European and Japanese sports cars such as Ferrari and Nissan, et al): Uses a sealed unit that contains a silicone-based fluid that heats up when the first wheel starts to slip and then engages the other wheel. It typically grabs faster than the LSD-clutch type.

eLSD or "E-Diff": Corvette C7 Z51 option: A smart electronic limited-slip differential (eLSD) that continuously makes the most of the torque split between the rear wheels. The system features a hydraulically actuated clutch that can infinitely vary clutch engagement and can respond from open to full engagement in tenths of a second. It shifts torque based on a unique algorithm which factors in vehicle speed, steering input and throttle position to improve steering feel, handling balance and traction.

The eLSD is fully integrated with StabiliTrak and Performance Traction Management systems. Its calibrations vary among three modes, based on the Drive Mode Selector setting:

• Mode 1 is the default setting for normal driving and emphasizes vehicle stability

• Mode 2 is engaged when electronic stability control is turned off in the Sport or Track Driver Modes. This calibration enables more nimble turn-in and traction while accelerating out of a corner

• Mode 3 is automatically selected when Performance Traction Management is engaged. This calibration has the same function as Mode 2, but is fine-tuned to work with Performance Traction Management.

I hope this synopsis answers some lingering questions from fellow C7 enthusiasts :)
 

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Do you think for a daily driver, the Z51 is alright for city driving on crappy roads? Would the ride be to jarring vs the base?
 

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Do you think for a daily driver, the Z51 is alright for city driving on crappy roads? Would the ride be to jarring vs the base?
You would definitely want to add the mag system if you are getting the Z51. Without it, it will be harsher than the base ride. :cool:
 

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Do you think for a daily driver, the Z51 is alright for city driving on crappy roads? Would the ride be to jarring vs the base?
If you have not already seen it, you ought to watch this in-city Stingray review by Edmunds (the urban locations begin after the 8:00 mark in the video):

 
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